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This image Tasca by José Avillez, a restaurant in the Mandarin Oriental Jumeira, Dubai, with lighting by dpa lighting consultants. With the spectre of social distancing likely to remain for some time, lighting now needs to flexibly align with evolving spaces


Richard Bolt,


partner,


dpa lighting consultants


LIKE MANY sectors, hospitality has unfortunately been hit very hard by the pandemic. More than ever before, I feel it will be necessary for hotel restaurants to be designed with fl exibility in mind to cater for interchangeable usage, table layouts and confi gurations associated with social distancing and diff ering group sizes, as well as interior themes and displays. It could be that within a restaurant space, more retail and art displays are introduced to break up the density of dinners, and to provide a greater aesthetic impact.


For lighting, the trends need to follow suit. Fittings need to be integrated so that lighting can align with these evolving spaces. For instance, the use of tuneable white light to illuminate changeable displays and dining spaces to coincide with the time of day, theme, materiality and colour palettes. Perhaps also a greater use of remote- controlled light fi xtures to ease the burden and practicality of regular re-aiming, based on diff ering table layouts. T e miniaturisation of fi ttings through the evolution of LED sources has provided lighting designers with the most extensive architectural lighting tool kit range so far.


Lighting products can now be very neatly integrated within exterior and interior details, with their form minimised and often concealed so that we only enjoy the layering of light and eff ects, while not viewing the source. T e exception, of course, is decorative lighting where such fi xtures are intended to provide a visual narrative and statement.


For me, while the decorative lighting market has evolved and developed greatly in recent years, there still remains the need for improvement regarding the integration of light sources, increased understanding of the technical characteristics and interplay between the lamps and the materials being illuminated, and the smoothness and stability of dimming down to very low levels for restaurant environments. T is would mean less reliance on decorative lighting to illuminate the dining tables, which can be picked up by a separate layer of focused downward light. It will be really interesting to see how interior design and lighting design respond and adapt with cohesion to the changing times and trends ahead.


MANDARIN ORIENTAL JUMEIRA, DUBAI


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