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068 FOCUS


Rob


Honeywill, design director, MBLD


COVID-19 HAS clearly been a catalyst for change, and hotels and restaurants are having to adapt. Perhaps the future will see temperature reading, facial recognition and using our smart tech to minimise touchpoints, such as check-in. Keyless room entry, for example, may become more prevalent if not the norm, and where lighting is concerned, controls in guest rooms could well be operated through a phone app. T e use of automated passive cleaning with UV light throughout could be a part of future cleaning regimes. Maybe future luminaires will see a UV element as part of the design in new builds. While the pandemic will trigger some developments, there are, of course, more general identifi able trends in restaurant and hotel lighting. We continue to see more use of dynamic lighting, and a great deal more emphasis on dim-to-warm for linear lighting. T ere is also a use of much wider colour temperature ranges with fi lament LEDs, which recreated the look and feel of tungsten when halogen was phased out. T is will be with us for some time to come. Where future trends are concerned, I see more


simplifi cation of the overall design approach for food and beverages, allowing area design to be cleaner and less technically cluttered. Luminaire miniaturisation will continue, with improved light outputs and more fl exibility. Tuneable and dynamic lighting will create greater opportunities for more lighting eff ect with less – crucial when interior designers and architects want to maximise on space while still giving the same experience.


Below MBLD’s Finolhu Resort, Maldives, has proved that simplified design is more likely, and the use of dim-to-warm technology is increasingly widespread


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