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Lighting can provoke and evoke emotion, and it can manipulate consumer behaviour. Tis makes it a very influential tool for hospitality spaces as it can both tempt and serve a guest by deciphering their emotional response to the brand. Tis means that we need to create different moods and ambiences, and also design-flexible schemes that allow spaces to be reconfigured as needs change. Lighting and lighting control play a key role in achieving this functional transition, making what might have been an intimate, low-uniformity, high-contrast restaurant into a bright and comfortable location to work or relax in during the day.


Furniture is also often repositioned, requiring greater flexibility and versatility from the lighting scheme to reflect temporary remodelling. Considered use of lighting controls and using layers of light can optimise the mood and energy within a space for its various roles throughout the day.


‘The hospitality industry is facing real change in this so-called “new normal” environment, and lighting schemes will need to adapt in order to evoke the type of ambiences that will bring guests back into hotels and restaurants’


Reigniting the flame of social interaction could be a hard sell for the hospitality industry. When lockdowns are eased, what’s the likelihood that we will all rush back into hotel bars and bustling restaurants? Many of us will desperately seek human interaction, while others may be more apprehensive. Tis will naturally affect the industry, with measures required to ensure that guests feel safe and are more comfortable. But enticing people back into hospitality spaces will go far beyond a feeling of safety. Hotel and restaurant brands will feel an increasing sense of pressure to boost sales, but they will also need to adapt to a post-pandemic world. After a year of setting up shop at home, the need to rely on flexible working spaces is paramount. Pulling out the laptop in a cafe and connecting to the Wi-Fi was once a pastime for trendy 30-somethings, but now that we’ve all had a taste of the remote working life, seeking new places to accommodate it is what we are


ALEX JEFFRIES


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