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FRAME OF MIND


In our latest glimpse into the creative mind, FX readers discover how the art found in the National Gallery and Tate’s permanent collections has inspired Richard Parr


Richard Parr, Richard Parr Associates


BEING ASKED to resonate with art is something that happens to me hourly and daily, but being asked to limit to three pieces is demanding.


Having spent arguably the most untravelled of years, it has, however, been one of the richest in terms of appreciating my home, my country and the culture close to that home.


So, I restrict my choice to British artists to reflect this. Te following three paintings pick on some very personal and relevant feelings. I have a love of the English landscape, layered with centuries of intervention, and in many ways anything but natural. I have lived much of my life between London and the country, growing up in the latter. I have also grown to appreciate the benefit we have from light and weather systems in a damp Atlantic climate. Never more so was this apparent than when, after nearly nine years living in Spain, I returned home and was astounded by the softness and greyness of our natural light – when everyone else bemoans it as dull and dreary. My own architectural work is increasingly defined by its landscape intervention. My lockdown was spent running in the Cotswolds and working in my glass studio with long views across the hills. Terefore, I have to select a JMW Turner landscape from the Tate – and what better defines my mood than Margate (?) from the Sea. Te beauty is breathtaking. Also, Graham Sutherland’s Entrance to


a Lane for two reasons. Te Gloucestershire lanes have been my running track and my route out during this period. Te 1940 painting casts some foreboding images of the war in the same way things have unfolded with the pandemic, as a cloud over our lives. But John Piper is my ultimate artist of choice, reflecting my obsession with buildings in England. I am surrounded by his lithographs at home and, in particular, a beautiful drawing that I acquired last year. Tese choices reflect my mood, and the satisfaction and appreciation of being lucky enough to live and work where I do.


027


Unfortunately, because Turner’s Margate (?), from the Sea and Sutherland’s Entrance to a Lane are not currently on permanent display at either the National Gallery or Tate, we are unable to reproduce them here.


JOHN PIPER


ST MARY LE PORT, BRISTOL, 1940


Available to view at Tate Britain, © Tate


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