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FOUR US TRAVELERS equal the spending of


ONE FOREIGN VISITOR


Shopping malls and centers are not new to our international counterparts. Alberta’s West Edmonton Mall topples the Mall of America as North America’s largest mall, while you can walk for miles through Hong Kong’s labyrinth of stores strung throughout its financial district skyscrapers or get lost in the neon lights of Shanghai’s Nanjing Road. Our major brands aren’t landlocked, as they can be found in retailers across the globe. Tere is certainly some uniqueness to American shopping, however, as global contributors to a lively Quora thread and Business Insider note that the sheer volume and variety of things in supermarkets is astounding, while the idea of easily returning items and 24-hour convenience stores provide novel experiences. Despite the cultural confusions of American tipping, and our country being a land of credit cards while Europeans prefer cash and Asians prefer mobile apps, shopping is a popular activity.


And you definitely want international guests shopping in your city.


According to NYC & Company, it takes four US visitors to equal the spending of just one foreign traveler. Foreign visitors accounted for just 20% of the more than 58 million people who visited the city in 2015, but they contributed nearly half of the total $42 billion these visitors spent. Who is the major driver of this shopping?


International Traveler


US Visitors CHINA. 35


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