search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
AUTHENTICALLY American


A visit to the United States is inherently authentically American – catching a game at Wrigley Park, grabbing lunch at In-N-Out, or strolling Central Park – all of these are American experiences simply based on the sights, sounds, and people who populate these spaces. Te most “authentically American” experiences for our international respondents can be categorized as Food (24%), Locations and Landmarks (21%), and Leisure (18%).


WITHIN THE “AUTHENTICALLY AMERICAN” RESPONSES


BURGERS, BBQ, FAST FOOD, JUNK FOOD, SPORTS, THEME PARKS, MOVIES, AND SHOPPING


were all prime ambassadors of the American experience. Leisure


For the foodies of today, tasty treats often come top-of-mind when traveling the world – how ingredients are sourced, stored, prepared, and served tells so much about people’s community, family, values, economy, and culture. Smells of savory bao conjure warm feelings of street stalls in Shanghai, while grabbing a cob of corn covered in mayonnaise and chili pepper can make most bellies grumble and long for Dios Muertos. Unsurprisingly, technology ranked as the lowest “authentically American” asset, most likely since so much of our hardware is imported, as well as transportation – hypothetically because these other countries also have similar taxis, buses, streetcars, trains, and planes, so ours don’t stick out as clearly American. Tese insights may explain why campaigns like Brand USA’s “Ask a Local” have been so popular.


Local Life


Scenery 18% 9.8% 9.4% Identity 8.3% 25


Location/ Landmarks


21%


Top 6 experiences mentioned as Authentically American


Food 24%


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56