search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HANDLING OBJECTIONS


Objections Represent Your Road to Sales Success


ROGER M. PELL


Research on sales objections has shown that pre- sentations resulting in a sale have 58% more objec- tions than unsuccessful presentations. Think of that – 58% more objections. It seems the road to sales success is paved with good objections. So why are there so many of them, and what’s the most advan- tageous way to deal with objections?


Objections are defense mechanisms. Most prospects avoid a buying deci- sion because it represents risk. Conse-


quently, the average prospect will procrastinate as much (and as long) as the salesperson allows.


8 | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2021 SELLING POWER © 2021 SELLING POWER. CALL 1-800-752-7355 FOR REPRINT PERMISSION.


Objections fall into one of three categories: • Road signs • Insufficient information • Minefields


Listen to what your prospects say. They will invariably provide you with directions to their greatest concerns. Another way to say this is they will tell you what benefits are most important so you can present your product in a way that best satisfies their needs.


THE THREE OBJECTION TYPES Road Signs: These objections lead you to the next topic to make the sale – not away from a sale. If your pros- pect says, “It’s too small,” that should point you in the direction of the right size to fit your prospect’s needs. Insufficient Information: This is


nothing more than your prospect say-


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53