search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
BUENOS AIRES


FOUR SEASONS HOTEL


Before arriving in Buenos Aires, I was given the same restaurant tip by at least a dozen people. “You must go to Elena,” they all said. And they were right. Elena isn’t just about fine dining because it serves charcuterie and rotisserie options in true Argentine fashion. It’s one of two main restaurants at the super luxe 165-room Four Seasons Hotel Beunos Aires, both of which are among the best restaurants in the city. Breakfast at Elena was another highlight with a vast array of options available; in fact all food eaten at the Four Seasons will be memorable. The second restaurant, Nuestro Secreto – meaning ‘our secret’ – serves barbecue- style cuisine, with dishes served al fresco around a fire pit in the summer months. The hotel is actually a bit of a landmark in Buenos Aires. It sits at the top of a hill in the exclusive Recoleta district. It’s made up of two properties – the main 12-storey building, and the French-inspired La Mansion (pictured), which sits pool side and is where the top seven suites are. I woke to views of this stunning building every morning from my seventh floor suite in the main building. My stay was midweek, and the majority of guests were there on business, which meant I got the heated outdoor pool to myself most days. After dark I saw another side to the hotel. Cool bar Pony Line attracts a trendy crowd and the hotel becomes the place to be for hipster locals and tourists. The staff were attentive without


being overfamiliar. I was impressed I was given brand new trainers to borrow in the gym because I’d left mine at home. FOURSEASONS.COM/BUENOSAIRES


ABOVE: La Mansion, Four Seasons Hotel, and Elena, above, is one of two restaurants at the hotel and offers fine dining


air museum, in that it feels as though locals have opened up their homes to tourists and visitors. Caminito is best known for its brightly painted houses, restaurants and shops. With street performers, tango dancers galore and typically kind South American hospitality, it’s hard not to fall in love with your surroundings here. Before venturing to Caminito, the hotel receptionist warned us not to go off the beaten track in La Boca, and it’s best to advise your customers of this too. While the tourist area of Caminito is safe, there are some unsavoury areas not too far away.


COSMOPOLITAN ANGLES


The cobbled streets of San Telmo and Caminito are a far cry from the likes of Palermo and Recoleta, which are more metropolitan and cosmopolitan. Both are residential areas, but still have charm and history by the bucket load with museums and impressive architecture aplenty. While Recoleta still has firm links to the


60 — aspire march 2017


rich history that runs through the veins of Buenos Aires, Palermo is the exception and is unashamedly modern, with very few, if any, links to the past.


Palermo is chic; an abundance of


trendy bars and cool hangouts make it the place to go after dark – it’s the Shoreditch or Soho of Buenos Aires.


Recoleta, on the other hand, is home to Buenos Aires’ main attraction – which is, quite bizarrely, its oldest cemetery. It may sound morbid, and I, for one, was unsure about visiting, but the Recoleta Cemetery is enchanting. It’s hauntingly beautiful and a perfect tribute to the rich, famous and powerful residents of days gone by. Filled with sprawling family tombs, ornate crypts and extravagant monuments, many go here to reflect. It’s hard not to be in awe of the tributes built for loved ones, with more than 6,500 elaborate tombs dating back to 1822. This city’s passion for its history and heritage certainly stole my heart, that and the locals’ love of dancing!


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96