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SOUTH AFRICA


DINING AT EARTH LODGE JOHANNESBURG


Johannesburg is one of the most diverse and vibrant economic hubs in South Africa. We visited Soweto, a township in Gauteng,


where Nelson Mandela lived and Archbishop Desmond Tutu still lives. Because of this the area is heaving with tourists. Local restaurants including Nambitha and Sakhumzi are worth visiting, serving local cuisine. Orlando Towers, a decommissioned coal-


1. FOOD Head chefs Conradie and Daroll concentrate on simply-prepared dishes, choosing flavour over fuss. They discuss choices with guests and adapt dishes to suit different taste and occasions.


3. WINE Recognised as having one of the world’s best wine lists, Earth Lodge is home to a wine cellar with more than 6,000 bottles of the best


South African wines, with many from small boutique-style wineries. 3. PRIVATE DINING Staff will help you create the perfect private dining experience for a special anniversary be it a surprise gourmet picnic looking out over the bush, or a romantic dinner in the meditation garden.


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certainly helped make our trip that bit more memorable. The passion they have for their jobs and the knowledge, of not only the animals, but also the plants, insects and even the stars is incredible. The staff at Sabi Sabi take additional tests on top of the standard safari guide training course, plus the majority of the spotters, including Heavy, have lived and worked on the lands all their working lives. Exploring the reserve with such experienced guides who will do everything possible to make your trip special, even makes the 5am wake-up calls palatable. Each day includes an early morning and evening safari, with added extras


Who can resist a gin and tonic while watching the sun dip below the horizon?


fired power station, is a prominent landmark. Both towers are brightly painted, with one containing the largest mural in South Africa. Recommend adrenaline junkies try the 100- metre bungee jump between the two towers. Football is the main sport in Soweto, with


the two main teams being the Orlando Pirates and the Kaizer Chiefs, so a visit to the football stadiums is a must for any sport fans. And for those after a bit of retail therapy


recommend the huge Maponya Mall. To learn more about the history of Soweto, head to the Hector Pieterson museum – a sobering experience explaining the 1976 uprising. A unique way to see the neighbourhood is


through Soweto Backpackers, which provides a local bike tour and is a great way to interact with the local people. Don’t expect the bike ride to be particularly relaxing or easy – my legs definitely ached the next day after two and a half hours on the bike! sowetobackpackers.com


such as a barbecue in the bush and the classic safari tradition, sundowners. Who can resist a gin and tonic while watching the sun dip below the horizon of the South African plain? I know I can’t.


aspire march 2017 — 41


PHOTO: SHEM COMPION


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