search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FAMILY


MAIN PIC: Anassa hotel LEFT: Heated spa pool ABOVE: Joanna and Dexter in their hotel-branded bathrobes TOP: Dexter at the pool restaurant in Princesa Yaiza


Thanos Hotels. Two of the group’s Cyprus hotels, Anassa and Almyra, are particularly well-suited to families with infants, offering a clever Baby Go Lightly service that allows parents to pre-order a whole range of items to be placed in their rooms. This covers everything from large items, such as buggies, sterilisers and baby walkers, to essentials like nappies, milk and changing mats, and even convenient, non-essential but nice- to-have options, including baby baths, nappy bins and bouncers. The brands


of products, including Mothercare and Huggies, will be comfortingly recognisable to British clients.


LUXURY FOR LITTLE ONES


Thanos’ flagship property, Anassa, is truly exquisite, and having just undergone a three-year refurbishment, it’s looking particularly sleek. Sprawling over a wooded hillside an hour from Paphos airport, views over the neighbouring Akamas National Park lend an atmosphere of total seclusion. The pristine beach is


long, wide and deserted, with big rollers, so swimmers of all sizes are safer in the pools. Happily there are plenty to choose from, including a family pool, which, along with all the hotel’s plunge pools, is heated. Parents travelling at the very beginning or end of the season can also use the indoor heated spa pool, which is open to families in the mornings. Dexter loved his daily dips under the grand Doric columns, and we didn’t need to worry about trying to slather his wriggling limbs with sun cream as he could stay in the


aspire march 2017 — 49


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96