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March, 2020


www.us-tech.com


Page 93 OCC Intros Slimline Hybrid GPON Cables


Roanoke, VA — Optical Cable Corporation has released its Slimline


Hybrid Cables, a UL-listed solution for gigabit-capable passive optical networks (GPON). The cable com- bines GPON fiber optic cables with two copper conductors enclosed with- in the same jacket, allowing external power to essentially be pushed from a central location. The Slimline solution is excel-


lent for commercial applications, involving multiple, separated nodes or buildings, or where new, data- hungry applications are continually being added to the network. For enterprise networks, the


advantages of GPON are undeniable. These all-fiber networks cost less to implement than copper, provide


unlimited bandwidth potential, and as a passive network, require much less power. In addition, single-mode passive optical LAN infrastructure will support 10G-PON networks and beyond.


With the addition of power in


the new hybrid fiber/copper Slimline cabling, the benefits of GPON net- works have never been greater. It further simplifies installation and reduces costs by eliminating the need to run dedicated electric wiring. It can also be a significant benefit for aging buildings that experience fre- quent power outages. GPON utilizes a single fiber optic strand on which high-speed,


high-bandwidth data is transmitted in both directions (2.48 GB/s of down- stream and 1.24 GB/s upstream). The Slimline Hybrid cables can


contain either one or two strands of single-mode fiber and are UL Plenum rated for use inside build- ings, including above suspended ceil- ings.


In addition, they have a very


small bend radius and tensile strength almost three times that of


traditional Cat 6 copper cable. Contact: Optical Cable Corp.,


5290 Concourse Drive, Roanoke, VA 24019 % 800-622-7711 E-mail: info@occfiber.com Web: www.occfiber.com


UL-listed cable for gigabit-capa- ble passive optical networks.


Laser Wire Solutions Launches Inline Laser Wire Stripper


Pontypridd, UK — Lasers have been used commercially for many years to strip the insulation from high-value and complex wires and cables to enable an accurate connection, particularly where wires are small and delicate. In response to demand for these


applications, Laser Wire Solutions has launched a new, inline four- beam laser system, the Viking-4. This system allows for the removal of enamel from round wires up to 0.1 in.


Viking-4 laser wire stripping machine.


(3 mm) outer diameter and from rec- tangular magnet wires up to 0.8 x 0.8 in. (20 x 20 mm) with strip lengths up to 4 in. (100 mm). Other applica- tions for the technology include aero- space and medical devices, wherever a high-value motor is used. Lasers provide repeatable, high-


precision ablation, i.e. full removal of the enamel 360° from around the wire. The laser beam harmlessly reflects off the conductor, leaving it fully intact. The laser machine is maintenance- free and provides a rapid return on


investment. Contact: Laser Wire Solutions,


Ltd., Unit 12 Business Development Centre, Main Avenue, Treforest Industrial Estate, Pontypridd, CF37


5UR, South Wales, UK % +44-1443-841-738 E-mail: esther.apoussidis@laser- wiresolutions.com Web: www.laserwiresolutions.com


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