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Page 86


www.us-tech.com


March, 2020


EAO Improves Series 57 Compatibility with Cleaning Agents


Shelton, CT — EAO has upgraded its Series 57 all-in-one door-opening pushbuttons.


New Pr o duc t s Grieve Develops


Electric Walk-In Oven


and exterior, public building and transportation applications. Seam - lessly blending design and functional- ity, they were the first illumi- nated door-opening push - buttons to include optical, tactile and audible features in a single product. By improving the abili-


ty of Series 57 all-in-one door-opening push buttons to withstand harsh environ- mental and chemical influ- ences, EAO bolsters its abili- ty to serve the rail and bus segment. Features include: extra-


Series 57 all-in-one door-opening pushbuttons.


The product line now offers a


front bezel and symbol made from a coated plastic to improve reactions to different climates — particularly the harsh chemical substances common- ly found in cleaning agents. Since its launch in 2012, EAO’s


innovative and user-friendly Series 57 products have redefined the standard for passenger access in both interior


large, user-friendly op er ating


area; all-in-one optical, tactile and audible feedback; raised,


illuminated symbols that conform to TSI PRM and ADA; IP69K front pro- tection from liquid and dirt ingress; and operating temperatures from –40


to +185°F (–40 to +85°C). Contact: EAO Corp., One


Parrott Drive, Shelton, CT 06484 % 203-951-4600 fax: 203-951-4601


E-mail: sales.eus@eao.com Web: www.eao.com


Round Lake, IL — No. 976 is a 500°F (260°C) electrically heated jumbo walk-in oven from Grieve, currently used for heating molds at the cus-


customer’s location. Oven controls on No. 976


include a 13,500 CFM-powered forced exhauster (shown in the left


No. 976 jumbo walk-in oven.


tomer’s facility. Workspace of the unit measures 13 x 28 x 7.5 ft (4 x 8.5 x 2.3m). 360 kW are installed in Incoloy-sheathed tubular elements to heat the oven, while 49,000 CFM from two 20 HP recirculating blowers provide a combination of airflow to the workload. This Grieve jumbo walk-in oven


has 4 in. (10.2 cm) thick insulated walls, removable top-mounted heat chamber, aluminized steel interior and exterior, door seals eliminated and doors equipped with drag seals, plus the unit was constructed to split into four sections for shipment to the


foreground of the photo) and other safety equipment required to handle up to two gallons of flammable sol- vent at 370°F (188°C). Also onboard are a digital programming tempera- ture controller, SCR power controller and motorized dampers on the intake and exhaust for accelerated cooling and rapid purging. The oven was built to NEMA 12/NFPA 79 electrical


standards. Contact: Grieve Corp., 500 Hart


Road, Round Lake, IL 60073 % 847-546-8225 fax: 847-546-9210


E-mail: sales@grievecorp.com Web: www.grievecorp.com


Zero-Footprint LPDDR5 Grypper Socket from Ironwood Electronics


 





 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 





 





 


Eagan, MN — Ironwood Electronics has continued to design and manu- facture new Grypper/G40 test sock- ets for the latest releases of memory devices — LPDDR5. Ironwood’s Grypper socket, 109111-0003, allows testing of the newest-gen- eration of package-on-package LPDDR5 devices that have 496 balls and 0.02 in. (0.4 mm) pitch, with speeds up to 5,500 Mb/s. The LPDDR5 Grypper/G40


socket fits to the same location and PCB footprint as the device, allowing development and failure analysis. This PoP type socket is sur-


face mounted using standard sol- dering methods to the same location onto the top of a microprocessor, or directly to a PCB. The device is inserted by pressing down from the top, with no lid required. The unique geometry of the con-


tact grips onto the solder balls of the device. To remove the device a simple extraction tool can be used to pop the device back out of the socket and it is ready to install another device. This Grypper/G40 socket has


excellent electrical performance of 1 dB insertion loss up to 21.5 GHz. Force required to insert a device is 0.9 oz (25g). The socket is sold in three configurations. The socket con- figured with SnPb solder balls allows


109111-0003 Grypper socket for LPDDR5.


adjacent components that might be close to the target area where the socket is to be placed. The socket can also be purchased without solder balls. The version without solder balls requires the use of 0.008 in. (0.2 mm) thick stencil for the correct amount of solder paste allowing any type of solder paste to be used for


attachment. Contact: Ironwood Electronics,


1335 Eagandale Court, Eagan, MN 55121 % 952-229-8200 fax: 952-229-8201 E-mail: info@ironwoodelectronics.com Web: www.ironwoodelectronics.com


easy reflow/attachment onto a PCB with mounted components. The lower melting temperature of the SnPb solder will not affect any

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