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93


The latest news, keeping


residents and harbour users up to date.


BY CAPTAIN GEOFF HOLLAND • HARBOURMASTER/CEO www.dartharbour.org A


ssuming the government’s road map out of lockdown continues as planned, by


the time you read this, life on the river should be well on its way to normal again, with the usual buzz you’d expect in the summer months. Certainly, if the May Bank Holiday weekend is anything to go by, when we were treated to a constant stream of boats up and down the river, we’re in for a busy season. Following on from last month’s tips on safety while paddle- boarding, I’d like to remind all leisure users – from sailors to swimmers - of the importance of being considerate of others on the water, and of following safety guidelines. For more information, please visit our website www. dartharbour.org/about-dart- harbour/port-safety/ This month, I’d like to highlight some charity work carried out by one of our River Officers. Keith Langworthy has been involved in a fantastic project to restore a sea mine used as a collection box for donations to the Seafarers’ Society, one of the largest and most comprehensive seafarers’ support charities in the world. “When I took over the project


We have installed a special ‘sunbathing pontoon’ for our resident seals.


last year I asked our previous HM if I could bring it to our workshop at Hoodown for repairs and he kindly agreed.” Keith explained. “Unfortunately, on inspection I discovered that thieves had taken advantage of the weakened structure to break the lock and steal the money inside. So this restoration was essential.” A barge was used to lift the sea mine off its plinth in June 2020 and transport it to Hoodown, where Keith carried out the repairs over a period of ten months in lunchbreaks and after work. With badly-corroded steelwork and worn lid and fastening, it was no small task. Keith, who has worked for the harbour for 19 years, built a new steel base, repaired the damaged areas, wire-brushed and cleaned the inside, and gave the whole thing a new coat of paint. By the


time the sea mine was returned to its place on the north embankment in April it was looking as good as new. When you’re strolling along the river bank this summer please take a moment to appreciate his hard work and spare a few coins for the collection. On a final note, regulars on the


river may have noticed a couple of new additions over the last month or so. Firstly, the welcome return of cruise ships. Rest assured, safety remains a key concern and the DHNA has strict Covid-specific procedures in place which have been approved by the Government and Port Health. Each ship is required to have in place its own stringent protocols that will be submitted to DHNA prior to its arrival. We hope you enjoy the sight of these impressive ships – and the benefits they bring to the town and local area. Secondly, we have installed a


Corrosion , Work in Progress Work complete


special ‘sunbathing pontoon’ for our resident seals. The sun-loving creatures were regularly soaking up the rays on moored ribs and causing damage, so we have allocated them their own platform to enjoy the famous South Hams sunshine.


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