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the whole industry, which of course is a dangerous thing to think because you are going to get your legs cut off by existing industry who are protecting their own established yet compromised system. “But that is what I had done with K1, so I


knew this was definitely the answer.” Marc’s genius idea of pre-filling syringes with medication means that in places where healthcare workers are scarce, medication can be done by the patient themselves or a family member. It also bypasses the need


for wasteful glass vials containing medication to fill old-style syringes. He said: “Glass vials


“We deliberately came here because of the River Dart and Start Bay, we deliberately came here because of the beaches and


we deliberately came here because we didn’t want to be near London anymore,”


are incredibly energy inefficient, in most systems 40 per cent of them break during the processing, filling and transport. “They take months to make, even though they look incredibly simple, because they are a special type of glass called


Borosilicate and have to be very accurately formed. “With my new product we can make a long strip of 25 syringes every three seconds, fully formed, fully filled and sterile, labelled up and ready to go - which is a miracle. “It’s cheaper, faster and more environmental and uses half the plastic of the old-style syringe.” Marc describes his new-style syringe as the “Tetra Pak for medicine.” “The ex-CEO of Tetra Pak is a great


friend of mine; he was my first funder and he understood the relevance of moving away from glass. “Medicine packaged in glass uses


150 year old technology, it needs to come out of glass and go into something much more up-to-date.” I asked Marc how he felt about


being responsible for saving millions of lives. “You know I’ve been doing it


a long time so it’s not a burden but if I am not working to save lives it feels odd. “Of course, I feel immensely proud that the K1


syringe has been used billions of times and saved millions of lives. That’s a lovely feeling. I’d rather do that than do something else which didn’t have that outcome. “However, it’s solving the problem, which is the


motivation, it’s not because I want to be a lifesaver. “But I wouldn’t solve problems that didn’t save


lives. I am trying to be a mini hero rather than a super hero.” Selling the majority of his shares in ApiJect has enabled Marc to enjoy a slower pace of life, concentrate on the design aspect of the business and work mostly from his new South Hams home nestled in a sheltered coombe, which he moved into with Anna, a successful artist who has illustrated more than 100 books, and their three children last September. “We deliberately came here because of the River


Dart and Start Bay, we deliberately came here because of the beaches and we deliberately came here because we didn’t want to be near London anymore,” he said. “I don’t have to fly so much so didn’t need to be near Heathrow. I was flying to two countries a week for 20 years so it was completely exhausting. “Honestly, two years ago if somebody had said


you can live further out than an hour away from Heathrow, I wouldn’t have believed it.” When he’s not working Marc enjoys racing (see opposite with his daughters) with fellow Royal Dart Yacht Club members and building wooden kayaks – his most recent creation being a beautiful river- going kayak crafted from 60-year-old walnut.•


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