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Sponsored by Dartmouth Community Bookshop Book Review


THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE… O


ver the last year or so we have been bombarded with numbers and statistics have ruled our lives.


However, it seems they don’t always clarify a situation and sometimes they can be wildly misleading. If like me you’ve become more curious about the figures bandied about take a look at How to Make the World Add Up, Ten Rules for Thinking Differently About Numbers by Tim Harford (presenter of Radio 4’s More


by Emma Jones


in paperback. Hercule Poirot is travelling by luxury passenger coach from London to the exclusive Kingfisher Hill estate, where Richard Devonport has summoned him to prove that his fiancée, Helen, is innocent of the murder of his brother, Frank. Expect suspense, intrigue, devilish details and a backdrop of quintessential 1930’s England with our favourite Belgian detective.


69


or Less). This economist, journalist and presenter tackles the murky world of misinformation with wit, knowledge and a much appreciated honest approach. Using 10 simple rules for understanding numbers,


statistics and data – plus one golden rule - this insightful book shows that if we keep our wits about us and look carefully at the way numbers are sourced and presented we can evaluate and understand the world around us with confidence, curiosity and a healthy level of scepticism. As Bill Bryson says “Nobody makes the statistics of everyday life more fascinating and enjoyable.” Crime’s a popular choice in the summer and Private


Detective Cormoran Strike has his 5th outing in the new paperback by Robert Galbraith in Troubled Blood. Set in Cornwall the PI tackles the cold case of a missing woman, Margot Bamborough, who disappeared mysteriously in 1974. The book is as gripping and satisfying as you get with this proficient author who builds a breathtaking, labyrinthine epic with twists and turns throughout. The sparkey and unusual relationship with Strike’s partner Robin Ellacott adds another dimension to this worthy winner of the Crime and Thriller Book of the Year Award 2021. It seems that nobody numbers more fans or literary


successes than Agatha Christie. Following in her footsteps is a big task but one that Sophie Hannah has taken on with widespread approval. Poirot returns in her latest book – The Killings at Kingfisher Hill – which has just been released by Harper Collins


The Lamplighters by Emma Stonex and published


by Pan Macmillan looks set to be a popular choice this summer. Inspired by real events this is the story of 3 keepers who vanish from a remote locked lighthouse in Cornwall in 1972. The unsolved tragedy is uncovered 20 years later by an investigative journalist who is keen to discover the truth by revealing the secrets and hidden stories of the 3 very different women that the men left behind. Filled with grief, suspense, love, fear and a pervading power of the sea the thriller writer S J Watson describes it as a “mystery, a love story and a ghost story all at once” and “Stonex’s clever slow reveal is as much keen psychological drama as it is an intriguing thriller”― Independent Lastly a mention for the latest book by popular children’s author Lauren St John.Wave Riders (Pan Macmillan) tells the story of the Carter twins – Jess & Jude - who live a dream life sailing from one exotic destination to the next with their guardian, Gabriel. But after Gabe vanishes and a storm smashes up their lives, they’re left penniless and alone. When a wealthy, glamorous family offer them a home Jess and Jude find secrets hidden in the Blakeney’s stately mansion and race to solve the mystery of their identity. This exciting adventure story is the perfect standalone read for 9 – 12 year olds who enjoy thrilling adventures with themes of friendship, family and nature.


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