search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
61


Marc achieved his original ambition and has continued his health crusade by inventing a new injection system that was inspired by bee-stings. He called his new project ApiJect (named after the Latin for a bee, ‘apis’) and shortly before the Coronavirus pandemic received a grant from the American government of 130 million USD to build a prototype factory in South Carolina. ApiJect has now signed a multi-billion


USD agreement with the US government to build a national pandemic response network over a five-year period. Marc expects that by the end of the year his new-look syringes will be distributed far and wide to help vaccinate billions of people.


with this issue that no-one was addressing and WHO were turning a blind eye to. “I met Margaret Chang, WHO’s director


general, at a conference. She walked into a room where I was so I went up and introduced myself to her. “She saw me and refused to shake my


hand, she put her hand up out in front of her which in Asia – she is Hong Kong Chinese – is the worst insult you can give anyone, turned around and walked out of the room. “It turned out, long story short, that she


considered me a trouble maker. “I went downstairs for breakfast the next


He said: “I always had a mission to try and find a big problem in the world, and try and see if I could create, not a complete solution, but maybe an intervention for something. “After looking at the whole life-cycle of syringes – and actually when you start looking it’s an incredible industry to make such a humble little product – I was able to create the K1 syringe, and 17 years after first getting involved I sold the first one to UNICEF.” Talking about his incredible struggle to get his product accepted, Marc admitted it had been tough at times. “I love the process of looking at the


The reuse of syringes and needles in the


world right now kills 1.3million people a year, and causes 20 million cases of lifelong cases like hepatitis and HIV.”


day, found her and stood over her table and said “We need to talk”. “She threatened to call


security but in the end she did agree to talk. I flew to Geneva three weeks later and we sat down one-on- one and I explained my point. She declassified me as a trouble maker and together we worked on a change to global recommendations from WHO on Global safer


practices”. The Stowe-educated entrepreneur is


problem. I believe if you understand the problem fully it’s a bit like a jigsaw – there’s often one piece missing and it’s normally the solution. “You keep going because you know


that 99 per cent of the people will never look or think that way, so you’ve just got to keep going until you get enough people that give a damn to notice that missing piece. “The WHO was the biggest challenge,


to get them to change course: you’ve got this massive oil tanker and you’ve got to turn it around. “The reuse of syringes and needles in


the world right now kills 1.3million people a year, and causes 20 million cases of lifelong cases like hepatitis and HIV. “So the prediction in the newspaper from 1984 came true and we ended up


now on a mission to produce a new style of smaller, lighter syringe based on blister technology, and which comes pre-filled to allow patients to self-medicate. “The idea came when I was standing in our garden where my wife Anna kept bees and one of our bees flew past me. When I saw it I wondered if we could make something that could quantum leap


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116