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‘Just Chillin’


Santa Rosa, CA. ~ Musica Uni- versalis is Latin for “universal music.” A more poetic transla- tion is “music or harmony of the spheres.”


In ancient times, this


philosophical concept was not what we call “mu- sic” today, since it was con- sidered by scholars a harmonic, mathemat- ical, even religious


theory. T ey studied the propor- tions of the movements of the Sun, Moon and planets noticing that celestial bodies move in “or- bital resonance.” T at’s why, aſt er Pythagoras


studied the relationships he called them “tones” of energy. He con- cluded that the planets’ moving patterns were intervals between harmonious sound frequencies forming simple, numerical ra- tios. It was Plato who later on wrote that we should notice that astronomy and music are sensual studies. Astronomy for the eyes, music for the ears. And math- ematical, numerical proportions rule. Medieval students studied their Quadrivium: arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy, plus the required Trivium: gram- mar, logic, and rhetoric. T ese seven liberal arts are still the basis for higher education today. To- day, scientists have established data that shows providing chil- dren with a chance to study mu- sic really has an immense impact on their minds and future abili- ties to study. If you’d like to hear some en-


thusiastic young students per- form music on a variety of in- struments, tune in to KDFC, the Bay Area non-profi t, classical music station, to hear composer and pianist, Christopher O’Reilly host


his program “From the


Top.” He travels to diff erent mu- sic centers all across the country, interviews young music makers who then perform for the world-


A LITTLE HISTORY, Some FOOD...& MORE! Musica Universalis, Love and Quiches! by Ellie Schmidt ~ eschmidt@upbeattimes.com


wide radio audiences. Real clas- sical music fans. Do musicians of today care about all that? My good old friends in Colorado like to say: “You betcha’!”


the Spheres” is the title of mu- sic written by Mike Oldfi eld and Ian Brown. “Om” by the Moody Blues. “T e Earth sings Mi Fa Mi by T e Receiving End of Sirens. (Gustav Holst’s “T e Planets” was described by that composer as more astrological than astronomical since he did not include Earth, the Sun or Moon in his impressive musical descrip- tions.) Great performers like Billy Joel, Sting and Lady Gaga studied the fundamentals of music intensely. Lady Gaga is understandably proud of her Juil- liard School training. Many great musicians celebrate May birthdays. Happy Birthday to Alessandro Scarlatti, b. May 2, 1660, who composed many operas and oratorios. Both Jo- hannes Brahms (1833) and Peter Tchaikovsky (1840) shared a May 7th birthday! Irving Berlin’s, May 11th, 1888. Claudio Monteverdi b. 1567 May 15, Eric Satie b. May 17 1866, and Richard Wagner b. May 22, 1813, were all Spring ba- bies.


Erich Wolfgang Korngold b.


May 29, 1897, was the extraor- dinarily talented Austrian com- poser who moved to Los Ange- les, at the invitation of legendary Max Reinhardt in 1934, to write marvelous scores for many of Hollywood’s best fi lms, sixteen in all. His scores for the classic 1935 Midsummer Night’s Dream and 1938 Robin Hood fi lms are bril- liant.


poser of Star Wars scores, wrote that he was profoundly inspired by Korngold. One thing about musicians,


from working alongside so many over the years, is that they cer- tainly love to eat. Using all their creative energy makes them hun-


“The trouble is if you don’t spend your life yourself, other people spend it for you.” ~ Peter Shaffer UPBEAT TIMES, INC. • May 2018 • 5 “Music of


gry. Itzhak Perlman, the great violinist says with a shrug: “I love to cook!” He is a real “chef de cui- sine” at home! A favorite on menus the world over is “Quiche,” a savory, open pie with many choices of fi ll- ings add- ed


to an eggs and


milk/ cream


mixture. cold.


Always a de- lightful meal served hot or Oſt en


thought of as a French dish be-


cause of its popularity in the North-Eastern region between France and Germany known


as Alsace-Lorraine. A fi ne wine pairing would be from that area’s “Noble grapes,” a perfect Gewuerztraminer, fi ne Riesling, or chilled Pinot Gris. Many culinary experts show


recorded history of recipes for eggs and cream custards baked in pastry holding meat, fi sh, or even fruit dating back to the 14th Century. It can be great fun to make


with family and friends, whether you choose a quiche au fromage (cheese), provencale (with toma- toes), champignons (with mush- rooms), or fl orentine (with spin- ach).


use lardons (like pancetta), the British use bacon. Your choice entirely to bake it on sheet pans or in a beautifully decorated ce- ramic, scalloped dishware just in- tended for quiche. Choose ready baked pie shells, or pizza dough,


... continued on page 30


UPBEAT TIMES, INC. • May 2018 • 5 ~ First Facts & Trivia ~


One long-term study found that, at least in the Colorado Rocky Mountain region, spring begins, on average, about three weeks earlier than it did in the 1970s.


The fi rst post offi ce in the United States was created in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1774.


The United States Naval Academy was established in 1845 in Annapolis, Maryland.


Traditionally, the French


Carp and herring account for about 50% of all seafood caught each year.


The carp was the mascot of the radio station WKRP on the TV show ‘WKRP in Cincinnati’ which ran from September 18, 1978 to September 20, 1982.


John Williams, the com-


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