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Elegant ballroom space at the Museum of the American


Revolution in Philadelphia, PA photo credit: Werth Photography


120 guests comfortably and serves as an ideal setting for a corporate meeting, seminar or holiday party.


The Fuge recently added a new venue to its portfolio of offerings, as well. The Studio houses a working state-of–the-art recording studio headed by Grammy Award winning music producer Jim Cravero, who has worked with some of the biggest names and artists from all over the world.


The Studio can accommodate up to 180 guests for seated dinners with sepa- rate cocktail space immediately adja- cent to its main event space. All three of The Fuge’s venues offer in-house cater- ing, and all three have can be trans- formed to fit virtually any event theme.


In the heart of historic Philadelphia planners will find a new venue that’s dedicated to the founding of our nation. Museum of the American Revolution seeks to inspire learning about the his- tory of the American Revolution and the significance of the founding ideals of the Declaration of Independence.


The museum has its roots in Valley Forge, where over 100 years ago a rev- erend purchased George Washington’s War Tent with the intent of creating a museum dedicated to the founding of


4­ 0 November­z December­2017


the United States of America. This tent ultimately became the Museum of the American Revolution’s most prized exhibit among its collection of 3,000 Revolutionary War era artifacts.


Just steps from Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell, the museum’s design and architecture reflect and honor the rich history of the surrounding neigh- borhood. The proximity of many local and regional historic sites - including battlefields, burial grounds and historic houses - makes it easy for guests to incorporate exploration of the area, the “Headquarters of


the American


Revolution,” into their event. In fact, the museum recently launched a website, www.amrevhq.org, to help visitors plan their own “Revolutionary” itinerary.


For events, the Museum of the American Revolution boasts an elegant ballroom as well as a variety of unique spaces that include: state-of-the-art theaters, a large rotunda, a grand elliptical stair- case, and outdoor terraces overlooking Independence National Historical Park.


The museum’s core exhibition can serve as a unique and memorable addi- tion to any special event, enabling guests to gain a deeper understanding of the people, ideas, and events that forged the United States of America.


Exclusive caterer, Brûlée Catering, can create a personalized experience around the treasures of the museum, complete with colonial-inspired menus.


Philadelphia has long been a hub for history-related events. The Museum of the American Revolution certainly enjoys the city’s historical connections, but also, by virtue of its newness, has quickly become a popular site for cele- brations of all kinds, including social functions, corporate groups, and even the Taste Philadelphia James Beard Foundation Benefit Dinner.


The museum’s second-floor exhibits are available for private event groups at an additional cost, so if the museum expe- rience is something that planners want, they can request that it be part of their event. Food and drink, however, are not permitted inside the exhibit space.


The Oneida Indian National Atrium, which is located on the second floor, provides a unique experience for guests and is ideal for cocktail recep- tions of up to 100. Food and drinks can be enjoyed in the atrium before going into the theater or exhibit galleries.


Popular exhibits at the museum include the aforementioned General George


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