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IN SEASON


Overripe, Under-Used


Berries in general are very delicate fruits and sometimes strawberries can turn from plump and juicy to overripe and mushy in a blink of an eye – but this doesn’t mean they are ready for the bin.


Super ripe strawberries are incredibly sweet and still totally edible even if they no longer meet the grade of adorning your Victoria sponge or scones. Why not give them a lease of life using these simple serving suggestions;


SAY HELLO TO DORSET’S FIRST COLD BREW COFFEE LIQUEUR


N


o visit to Dorset is complete without a generous measure


of Conker Gin – the county’s much-loved Dorset Dry. Born and bred in Southbourne, Conker Spirit is Dorset’s very fi rst gin distillery, who’s Dorset Dry epitomises the taste of the South Coast – from its craggy clif ops and salty shores to its wildlife- rich woodlands. But it’s their latest


product seems to have cause a bit of a stir… a deliberate curveball away from aged, navy strength or fl avoured gins, Conker now bring us an honest cold brewed coff ee liqueur that lets the Dorset-roast speciality coff ee do the talking, without the need for the usual additives and fl avourings ‘’We came to realise that we


couldn’t fi nd a single so-called ‘coff ee liqueur’ that even closely resembled the true dark and rich complexities of the espresso. So we set out to make one’’ says founder and ‘Head Conkerer’ Rupert. It sounded a simple enough


idea. How wrong they were… It turns out that to capture the true taste of freshly roasted


coff ee in a liqueur, you’ve got to master a complex balancing act of roasting, blending and brewing that takes no prisoners. ‘’One wrong move, one


shortcut, and the taste is compromised’’ says Rupert. Aſt er a year of tweaking and


sipping their way through 96 recipes, Conker have discovered some subtle tricks and a blend that surpassed all our expectations - a complex, dark and fruity brew that celebrates the espresso and owns the glass. Working with


Beanpress Coff ee Co., Conker selected the very best speciality Brazilian and Ethiopian


coff ees, which are brewed cold so as not to extract any of the acidic, bitter elements of the bean. With natural vanillas and caramels, just a touch of demerara sugar is needed to complete the alchemy – no fl avourings, no additives, no nasty thickeners – just four simple ingredients and one ridiculously precise process.


❤ Blitz – pop in a food processor along with other soft berries and a dash of milk or yoghurt to create a delicious breakfast smoothie. Why not freeze this down to make frozen yoghurt dessert.


❤ Muddle – simply muddle the berries with a little mint and top with a generous splash of sparkling wine. Alternatively slice and add to a punch bowl for summer cocktails.


❤ Crumble – combine strawberries with other seasonal fruits and top with a nutty crumble. A taste of summer in a comforting dessert.


❤ Stew – cook down overripe berries to create a sweet compote to top yoghurt, pancakes or porridge.


QUICK STRAWBERRY FROZEN YOGHURT


500g frozen strawberries 500g Greek-style yoghurt 2 tbsp runny honey


1 Place all of the ingredients into a food processor and blend until smooth.


www.conkerspirit.co.uk


2 Transfer to a suitable container and freeze until required. www.lakeland.co.uk


38 | THE WEST COUNTRY FOODLOVER


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