search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
IN SEASON


SEARED TUNA STEAK SALAD WITH GINGER & LIME VINAIGRETTE


FOR THE TUNA 120ml soy sauce 2 tsp cornflour


120ml pineapple juice 120ml runny honey 2 tsp chilli garlic sauce 4 tbsp toasted black & white sesame seeds 1 tbsp sesame oil 4 fresh tuna steaks


Makes 4


FOR THE SALAD 240g spring greens or bistro salad leaves Half a bunch fresh coriander 350g fresh pineapple chunks 1 red chilli, sliced


FOR THE VINAIGRETTE 240ml sesame oil or toasted sesame oil 120ml soy sauce 4 tbsp pineapple juice 4 tbsp rice vinegar 2 tsp chilli garlic sauce 2 tbsp tahini Zest & juice of 2 limes 4 tsp fresh ginger, grated 2 cloves garlic, grated or minced 2-3 tbsp toasted black & white sesame seeds To serve, 2 avocados, peeled, halved and sliced


1 In a small saucepan, mix the soy sauce and cornflour until smooth. Stir in the pineapple juice, honey, chilli garlic sauce and sesame seeds.


Place the pan on a medium heat and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 3-4 mins until the sauce is just beginning to thicken and coat the back of a spoon. Set the pan aside.


2 Heat a large griddle pan on high and add 1 tbsp sesame oil. Sear the tuna steaks for 1-2 mins, then flip and brush the seared side with the soy sauce mixture. Sear for 1-2 mins more, then remove the steaks from the pan and brush them with the remaining soy sauce mixture. Slice into strips.


3 To prepare the salad, combine the greens, coriander, pineapple chunks and sliced red chilli in a bowl.


4 In another bowl make the vinaigrette by combining the sesame oil, soy sauce, pineapple juice, rice vinegar, chilli garlic sauce, tahini, 2 tsp lime zest, juice of 2 limes, fresh ginger and garlic. Add the sesame seeds.


5 To serve, divide the salad between 4 plates. Peel, halve and slice the avocados and place on top of the salad with the seared tuna, then drizzle over the vinaigrette.


www.lakeland.co.uk L Loving Lettuce


ettuces are oſten an unsung hero of the vegetable patch. Te bedrock of any summer salad, leaves are almost always outshone by other more colourful ingredients that sit proudly on the top. However, lettuce leaves are low in calories and are a great way to bulk out recipes and pack in lots of nutrients too.


Whether you’re looking for sweet, soſt,


subtle, or bitter flavours, lettuce leaves cover it all. Tere are hundreds of different varieties with varying textures and tastes, ideal for both hot and cold dishes. We asked Nick Rose of Farrington's Farm


what we can expect to see in our salad bowls this summer. "Our red soil at Farrington’s has a really sandy base and is just wonderful for growing


LOOSE LEAF VARIETIES


❤ GREEN OAK Sometimes known as butter lettuce, Red Oak has vibrant red and green quilted leaves, almost autumnal in colour. This leaf has been shown to contain strong antioxidants and has a mild, sweet yet earthy flavour.


Flavour friends: Red Oak goes well with sharp, citrus flavours as well as the sweetness of red grapes. Try dressing the leaves with an acidic, lemon based dressing.


❤ GREEN OAK This lettuce is similar to the Red Oak but with bright green leaves and has a sweet, earthy taste. Known as butter lettuces due to their loose-leaf head, they have sweeter leaves towards the centre. Oak leaf lettuces are a good source of vitamin A and C.


Flavour friends: with a strong earthy flavour, Green Oak can stand up to strong savoury and robust ingredients such as mushrooms, avocado and bacon as well as any punchy dressing.


TOP TIP: Don’t throw lettuce away just because it’s been in the fridge and gone a bit limp! Just discard the outer leaves and the ones


underneath should be perfect. 10 | THE WEST COUNTRY FOODLOVER


all kinds of crops but the lettuces thrive particularly well, especially in the fabulous sunny spring weather we’ve been enjoying this year. We’ve planted 20,000 lettuces this year,


all of which are organic and growing fast. Although hundreds of types to choose from, Farrington's favourite four varieties include Red Oak Leaf, Green Oak Leaf, Little Gem and Iceberg."


HARD LETTUCE VARIETIES


❤ LITTLE GEM Otherwise known as Baby Gems, Little Gem lettuces are a mini version of the Cos lettuce. They contain sweet, crisp and robust leaves that store and keep really well. These are the most versatile lettuce you can buy and sturdy enough to griddle on the barbecue.


Flavour friends: Little Gems can handle a good splash of dressing and compete with a powerful mature cheese. Typically used in a traditional Caesar salad, this lettuce is perfectly paired with shavings of parmesan and crisp, salty pancetta.


❤ ICEBERG One of the most popular of the lettuce family, Iceberg is delicately sweet with a crunchy texture. Great shredded for adding texture to sandwiches, burgers and wraps, Iceberg lettuce contains slightly lower nutritional value than some lettuces. However, it is still an excellent source of potassium and manganese as well as iron, calcium and magnesium.


Flavour friends: Iceberg's sweetness means it's perfectly paired with fresh fruits such as peaches, mangoes and tomatoes. Extremely versatile, it can carry most dressings well and works great with a honey and mustard vinaigrette.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68