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SPONSORS OF THE CONCRETE FOUNDATION FEATURE GRAVITAS OFFSHORE


PARTNERSHIP GRAVITAS Offshore is a partnership between Hochtief, Costain and Arup, founded on long term relationships, and combines unique capabilities to serve the growing energy sector.


Hochtief’s strong marine competence, Costain’s marine construction experience and Arup’s offshore marine and concrete structure design expertise are a strong basis to offer a unique and differentiated solution that fully integrates the design, construction, offshore installation and decommissioning of foundations for offshore wind farms.


FOUNDATION SELECTION Optimum foundation selection is a function of the variables of water depth, turbine size and wind farm location conditions. As the water depth and turbine size increase, harsher installation and operating conditions apply, the existing foundation design becomes limited.


FLEXIBILITY There is also a need to achieve greater flexibility through the supply chain that can increase the market’s capacity and avoid dependency on large scale steel tubulars.


Offshore wind farms are capital intensive projects and turbine foundations represent a quarter of their total delivery cost. The renewable industry is looking for creative yet dependable new approaches to drive down this cost, whilst optimising installation flexibility and facilitating improved operation and maintenance.


SOLUTION GRAVITAS responds with an optimal solution to meet these challenges. The solution is self-buoyant, requires no specialist onshore or offshore marine equipment to construct, lift or install and requires minimal seabed preparation. Offering life cycle carbon footprint benefits through material selection.


ROYAL BAM GROUP


GRAVITY BASE FOUNDATIONS BAM has developed two designs for Gravity Base Foundations (GBF) to suit differing load conditions. Both designs provide competitive solutions for offshore wind turbine and substation substructures


5MW WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS For wind turbines up to 5MW, GBF structures are built at suitable locations onshore, for example in existing dry docks or purpose built manufacturing


installation, the GBF is ballasted with sand to provide the required stability. Scour protection around the base completes the installation.


10MW WIND TURBINE FOUNDATION An alternative design provides a GBF solution for larger turbines up to 10MW, This design has been developed for the Vertax vertical axis wind turbine but is equally applicable to the currently more conventional horizontal axis machines. In this case, the GBF is built and fitted out inshore with its full turbine and blade assembly, and towed to its offshore site using a purpose built flotation barge. Controlled sinking onto a prepared sea bed is again followed by grouting and scour protection around the base structure. This solution has the major advantage of reducing significantly the installation work required offshore for assembly of the turbine and blades.


in water depths up to 50 metres. The designs are based on proven technologies used elsewhere in the offshore oil and gas sector, and extensive BAM marine experience,


64 www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


yards. Being self-buoyant, the GBF is towed offshore and sunk in a controlled manner onto a prepared sea bed. The foundation solution can be either steel skirt and grouted base or gravel bed. After


Royal BAM Group www.bam.co.uk


Following a research and development programme they offer a self-installing turbine foundation that can be mass produced in construction facilities located in ports to suit rapid deployment to the UK wind farms.


GRAVITAS Offshore www.gravitasoffshore.com


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