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SPONSORS OF REGIONAL FOCUS


HUMBERSIDE ENGINEERING TRAINING ASSOCIATION (HETA)


SERVICES AND COMPANIES INVOLVED


Jacob Lofthouse, Hull’s first ever wind energy apprentice


HETA, HUMBERSIDE ENGINEERING TRAINING ASSOCIATION, IS A NOT- FOR-PROFIT CHARITY WHICH HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED SINCE 1967. THE COMPANY HAS THREE SITES ACROSS THE HUMBER; HULL, THE CATCH FACILITY AT STALLINGBOROUGH AND AT TATA STEEL (FORMALLY CORUS) IN SCUNTHORPE


HETA’s main service is to offer an end- to-end Engineering Advanced Apprenticeship. They recruit and train over 200 apprentices


each year across the three sites. These are then placed within companies, a small number of the companies who have taken apprentices include, BP, Conoco Phillips, Logan Teleflex, Centrica, Yorkshire Water, Ecotricity, Crown Paints and many more. In addition to this, HETA also delivers a range of engineering, safety and management adult training courses to industry.


WIND ENERGY SPECIFICS HETA are proud to have 10 wind energy apprentices and are the first training provider in the region to train for the wind energy industry. Ecotricity have 4 wind energy apprentices, Blackrow Engineering have 5 and RES have one, who is the Humber’s first offshore wind apprentice.


Chris Holden, Contract Manager at RES said “The HETA apprenticeship scheme is second to none. As a former apprentice myself, I knew when my organisation asked me to look at apprentice training providers, that HETA would be able to meet our needs. We now have an RES Offshore Apprentice training at HETA and we’re delighted that they were so flexible to meet our requirements and design a bespoke renewable energy apprenticeship.”


SELECTION PROCESS


All apprentices come through HETA’s renowned 6 Step Selection process which begins every February and whittle down around 750 applicants for 100 places. Included in this are aptitude tests, workshop assessments and formal interviews all to ensure that the companies who are taking on the apprentices are getting the best candidates for a career in engineering.


HETA www.heta.co.uk http://www.windenergynetwork.co.uk/enhanced-entries/heta/


TATA STEEL SUPPORTING REQUIREMENTS IN THE HUMBER AREA


Tata Steel is an energetic business with a great heritage in steelmaking in the Humber region. It is part of the global Tata Group, one of the world’s most respected businesses, with operations in every major world market.


TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PROJECT EXPERIENCE Tata Steel has over 120 years experience in manufacturing steel products for the most challenging projects all over the world. The company has extensive experience in supplying steel solutions to support all types of energy and power generation including wind power.


INVESTMENT IN WIND ENERGY SUPPLY CHAIN DEVELOPMENT Tata Steel has established a Wind Tower Service Hub within their operations in Scunthorpe. This specialised team is focussed on streamlining the supply chain for wind tower fabrications. Using quality steel manufactured at Tata Steel’s facilities


in Scunthorpe or Dalzell, the company offers bespoke product processing capabilities including weld preparation, plate profiling, cutting to size and surface finishing options such as shot blasting and priming.


Tata Steel facilitates optimum processing down stream in the supply chain by delivering complete packages of steel materials


to match the specific build sequence for the project. This reduces stock levels and handling costs for their customers.


THE COMPLETE PACKAGE The plate manufacture and processing facilities at Scunthorpe are an integral part of Tata Steel’s overall proposition to the wind power generation sector. From production facilities located throughout the UK they supply steel products for


all parts of a wind turbine, from steel for foundations right through to speciality steels for nacelles.


Tata Steel is dedicated to understanding their customers’ business and building the role of the Humber region in this important sector in the future.


Tata Steel www.tatasteel.com


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www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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