This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
HEALTH & SAFETY


In the last issue, Risktec Solutions Ltd described the five simple steps of an effective Risk Management process. In this issue they explore the first and arguably most important step of ‘Hazard Identification’. You can’t measure and hence control a risk unless you understand the underlying hazard. Once hazards have been identified, the battle is more than half won. Hazard Identification is therefore the foundation of Risk Management.


EFFECTIVE HAZARD IDENTIFICATION


The key objective is to identify all reasonably foreseeable hazards associated with your endeavour and record these within a Hazard Register which forms the focus of subsequent risk management activities. To identify hazards effectively you must answer 5 questions.


1: WHY DO YOU WANT TO IDENTIFY HAZARDS?


Previous articles have covered the fundamental answer; because things go wrong and risks must be managed, so let’s delve a little deeper. You must be clear on the purpose and objectives of your endeavour to ensure the scope of hazard identification is adequate. Is the duck trying to get her duckling across the drain cover safely or recover her car keys? Clearly there are different hazards involved...


2: WHAT IS THE REQUIRED SCOPE OF HAZARD IDENTIFICATION?


Whilst this is largely answered by the ‘Why’, you need to identify the exact range of equipment, operations, project activities, etc. that must be considered. Are interfacing issues adequately covered? Has the duck identified the asphyxiation hazard from the exhaust pipe? If in doubt include them in the scope of your hazard identification. After all, you can’t manage what you don’t know.


3: WHEN SHOULD HAZARD IDENTIFICATION BE PERFORMED?


As early as possible is the simple answer. By identifying hazards early, action can be taken to eliminate them or incorporate appropriate controls, generally with minimal cost and programme implications. Don’t be like the duck and leave it too late! If hazard identification is delayed and detailed plans have been formulated, or worse still material work completed or a hazardous scenario encountered, it may not be possible to achieve your endeavour safely within budget and time constraints. However, it must not be performed too early, before a clear vision is formulated, as the list of hazards may be incomplete or irrelevant.


Hazard identification must not be viewed as a one-off exercise. It must be continuously reviewed to ensure the Hazard Register reflects the evolving nature of the project. If the direction or scope changes significantly, then hazard identification activities should be revisited.


20


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112