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Here’s a great idea for:


High-speed reaming


DIHART REAMAX® TS Modular precision reaming system


® Lasers


economy. Laser die-blanking is solving the problem of micro-fractures often seen in these harder materials when cut with die-blanking presses. “These micro-fractures in- crease the likelihood of a split during the subsequent draw process and this potential for defect is simply not present with laser cutting,” he explained. Aluminum is another material automakers are looking at adopting that a 1-µm fi ber laser can easily cut.


The idea:


Incorporating micro-adjustable reaming heads and holders into a Plug’n Ream tool system.


Why it’s great:


• Expandable head compensates for wear.


• Built in run-out adjustment with DAH Zero arbor.


• Head can be changed within the machine in seconds.


• Plug’n Ream system with DAH, ABS®


Learn more about this and other great ideas.


Go to www.komet.com/greatideas or scan this QR code.


or straight shank holders. Expanding Power, Precision, and Speed Companies like Amada are still improving the 1-µm fi ber laser. Its ENSIS fi ber


technology, for example, not only processes thin materials very fast—which has been the strength of fi ber lasers—but it also processes thick plate with the same speed and quality that higher wattage CO2


machines can do. Hillenbrand from


Amada believes this is revolutionary. “We are now cutting plates as thick as 1" mild steel with a 2-kW fi ber laser with quality comparable to a 4-kW CO2


laser,” he said.


The fi rst installation in the ENSIS-3015AJ system adjusts the beam confi guration automatically to cut different types and thicknesses. Trumpf is also improving the capabilities of its solid-state lasers. The company is now offering its TruLaser 5030 fi ber with its new BrightLine fi ber function that


www.komet.com 800-656-6381


96 ManufacturingEngineeringMedia.com | November 2014


The TruLaser 5030 fi ber, a 2D laser cutting machine with a 5-kW solid-state laser, uses the new BrightLine fi ber function to cut stainless steel up to 1” thick, along with other materials as shown in this test piece.


While Finn is pleased with the current speed and capabilities, he sees future improvement. He anticipates the day when laser power will be even more economi- cal. “Our laser gantry system is designed for the integration of a 10-kW laser. We are serious about someday building a laser-cutting system that will go faster than a mechanical press,” said Finn.


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