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Manufacturing Technology


spindle deactivation, recognition of idle operations result- ing in switch-off as well as stop at end of shiſt and warm-up functions. Machining can be optimized by means of a control override for adjusting feed override and a tuning cycle for adapting the machining operation to the process by means of defined cycles.


The energy costs of a machine tool amount to about 20% of costs over its complete life cycle. Up to 30% of these costs could be saved.


Individually Tailored Solutions Ensure Savings According to Alexander Verl, director of Institute at


Fraunhofer IPA and ISW (the Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation and the Institute for Control En- gineering of Machine Tools and Manufacturing Units; Stutt- gart, Germany), the energy costs of a machine tool amount to about 20% of costs over its complete life cycle. Up to 30% of these costs could be saved. However, with needs-oriented project planning and optimized machining processes, savings potentials should be even higher. “First of all,” Verl said, “we need to differentiate the ma-


chines in terms of the installed power. What this means is that the machine size should be individually tailored to the given range of workpieces. Operation of the machine also needs to be customized. Factors to be considered include two- or three- shiſt operation, breaks, continuous operation or unmanned shiſts as well as automation solutions and needs-based ma- chine utilization. “Process design also needs to be taken into account in or-


der to achieve optimum savings. Tis includes harmonization of component material and cutting material. Furthermore, machine size, spindle power, torque and table size need to be chosen in accordance with the requirements. “However, the basic requirement for achieving these kinds


of energy savings is innovative machine technology. Heller delivers extensive workpiece and process capability with simultaneous five-axis machining of complex geometries on several series of its horizontal machining centers.”


The Blue Competence Campaign In Europe, the Blue Competence campaign demonstrated


the competence of the German machine tool builders. It is very important to reduce media and energy consumption in cooperation with machine users. Heller has been involved in developing energy-efficient products and solutions within the overall system for years.


76 Motorized Vehicle Manufacturing According to Peter Wagner, head of Machines Develop-


ment at Gebr. Heller Maschinenfabrik GmbH, “We need to learn how to achieve an optimum changeover between full-load and part-load operation or idle state. For this purpose, Heller provided a machine to WZL (Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering) at RWTH Aachen University for extensive trials before and after a changeover. This way the increase in energy efficiency can be established and monetary benefits demonstrated to the user.”


Energy Efficiency Packages


At Heller, the use of regenerative drive systems, servo- motors with efficient utilization of the overall speed range and power-reduced valves has been standard for years just as consistent use of methods for topology optimization of structural components. These methods help to increase stiffness and to optimize masses of moving components. The more universal and varied the machining task, the more important is adaptive, i.e., requirements-based, cur- rent consumption of peripheral equipment and main units. For all Heller machining centers, energy savings are


partly based on the use of IE2 motors with up to 5% lower power consumption. We will realize even lower energy consumption with the introduction of IE3 motors in 2015. Additionally, this basic configuration includes shutdown of individual systems consumption after a programmable time interval. An entry-level package provides requirements- based shutdown of air consumption and constant media and filter monitoring. This supports customers by ensuring the smooth operation of their machines. In addition, flexible deactivation/activation of all systems includes shutoff or sleep mode of further functional units, including cooler, pumps, lights, chip conveyor, seal air and other separate options. The use of a frequency converter allows adaptable control of the volume flow of the high-pressure coolant pump, and thus adaptation of energy consumption, to the requirements of the machining task.


A flexible control instead of on/off control means, as with the coolant pump, the central cooler can be con- trolled by means of a frequency converter in accordance with operating requirements. In combination with a new type of compression technology this results in a significant reduction in power consumption.


Booster technology based on the principle of pres- sure amplification provides low-noise and energy-saving high-pressure supply, while minimizing heat input into the hydraulic system.


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