This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TechView The Future


of Steel is Bright and Light


It is fashionable to refer to aluminum, magnesium, carbon fiber and plastics as the solutions du jour for lightweight- ing vehicles to meet accelerating CAFE standards. Te aluminum-intensive F-150 and the carbon fiber BMW i3 are two examples that have recently garnered heavy publicity for the use of materials other than steel. Te ques- tion is, are these vehicles representative of an overall trend towards alternative materials or are they exceptions to the direction most automakers will take? I believe that these vehicles are


special, as they have high margins that can absorb the use of more expensive materials. For the majority of vehicles, however, cost considerations will make it challenging to adopt materials that are less cost-effective than steel. Te good news is that the upcoming introduction of new steels, such as NanoSteel, will let designers reduce vehicle weight to nearly the same extent as alternatives. Tese new third-generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) will pave the way for OEMs to meet the CAFE standards in a cost-effective manner, use existing manufacturing infrastruc- ture, and maintain safety standards and predictable crash characteristics. Te NanoSteel Co., a spinoff of the


Idaho National Laboratory, is devel- oping a portfolio of third-generation AHSS that will offer designers the combinations of strength and formability that can deliver on this promise. Te technology combines conven- tional raw materials common- ly used in steel alloys, but in different ratios to create novel


microstructures. In conventional steels, the structure is measured in microns, where in NanoSteel, it is measured in nanometers. Te nanostructure of the sheet steel is the driver for the combi- nation of high strength and formability that offers new design opportunities for auto engineers.


Cost considerations will make it challenging to adopt materials that are less cost-effective than steel.


Te benefit of NanoSteel AHSS is


a higher formability-to-strength ratio. Tis ratio controls the ability of body structure designers to respond to increased strength demands without increasing part weight. With a higher formability ratio, parts can be stamped with greater complexity and more features. Tis is important because part complexity increases stiffness, which is key to determining vehicle ride qual- ity and safety. Stiffness represents the part’s ability to withstand the bending, twisting and vibrating forces encoun- tered during driving, and to a large degree determines how the structure will act during the beginning phases of a crash. Most high strength steels have formability limitations which require part geometry to be simplified and oſtentimes made thicker to maintain


Craig Parsons


President of Automotive NanoSteel Company Inc. Troy, MI


stiffness, thus reducing some of the lightweighting potential of those steels. NanoSteel AHSS’s combination of high strength and ductility gives engineers the tools to reduce weight and maintain strength without losing stiffness. In assessing the ability of NanoSteel


AHSS to lightweight automotive body structures, the company commissioned EDAG Inc. to conduct a study. EDAG used its existing NHTSA Light Weight Vehicle study as the basis of the analy- sis, which demonstrated NanoSteel’s ability to save 30% of the weight in a body-in-white over the baseline vehicle without reduction in vehicle structural performance or safety. Tese results also represent nearly 90% of the total lightweighting potential found by using an aluminum body structure and at a clear cost advantage. Carmakers are understandably risk-


averse when it comes to new materials. Body structure materials must perform predictably and consistently, not just for manufacturing reasons but for occupant safety. For this reason, NanoSteel is col- laborating with existing auto steel sup- pliers to bring these materials to market. Steelmakers are now proving out


the manufacturability of the new AHSS. Te next step: provide coils to OEMs and suppliers for full valida- tion so production parameters, mill capabilities, and material properties can be fully un- derstood before adoption on mass-market vehicles. With the introduction of new high strength and formability alloys, steel’s future is indeed very bright.


Motorized Vehicle Manufacturing 33


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208