This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Overview


expected to precisely represent the cutting edge geometry and accurately determine grinding paths for these tools, which are among the most widely used to cut molds and dies of 3D freeform surfaces. Te manufacturing forming process of forging has some


distinct advantages over casting or machining in terms of me- chanical properties of pro- duced parts. In NAMRC paper #4490 (in review for the Journal of Manufac- turing Processes), Italian authors investigate hot forging, a process shown to reduce production costs of titanium components for complex shapes with a limited amount of edge trim removal and machin- ing rework aſterward. Titanium alloys have high strength and weight performance and versatil- ity in high-temperature conditions and are used extensively in automotive applications including crankshaſts, connect- ing rods and a variety of drivetrain components. Te presented model takes into account the varying mechanical, thermal and metallurgical effects of some materials, a situation which applies particularly to titanium alloys, during phase transformation in hot forging. High-strength, lightweight aluminum alloys are suited to


high-temperature, high-ductility sheet forming applications but have disadvantages of low forming rates and produc- tion levels. Terefore, warm forming (or stamping of sheets in matched die sets, but at slightly elevated temperature) has been proposed as a viable process when faster times and higher volumes are needed. NAMRC paper #4493 (in press for the Journal of Manufacturing Processes; http://tinyurl. com/JMP-Form), by researchers from universities and a US automaker, explores a model for predicting the forming limit diagram (FLD—a tool used by automotive engineers to assess and compare the formability of sheet metals) based on the material constitutive model under isothermal conditions. In ICMP paper #5039, Japanese researchers examined


22 Motorized Vehicle Manufacturing


the effect of mold temperature on adhesion of thermoplastic resins in carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic press molding. Termoplastic resins are of high interest to vehicle companies to achieve the short cycle times not possible when long- heating-time thermosetting resins are used. Amorphous and crystalline thermoplastic resins showed maximum adhesion strength around glassy- transition temperature and melting point.


Assembly Advances Dissimilar materials are


increasingly part of ap- proaches to reduce mass in automotive body structures, but challenges remain in how to join them together. Friction stir forming (FSF) is one new process, which stir-heats one material and forms it into a mechanical interlocking joint of a sec- ond material. Experimental analysis in MSEC paper #4044 shows the poten- tial for aluminum-to-steel joining and possibly other dissimilar materials. Te process does not require riv- ets, bolts, fluids, substantial heating energy or additional mass, which simplifies the process as well as makes it economical and environ- mentally friendly. Te performance of


self-pierce riveting (SPR) in joining dissimilar materials


is evaluated in MSEC paper #4026. High-strength steel sheet is being used increasingly in conjunction with low-density alu- minum alloys in high-volume production vehicle structures for safety, durability and weight reduction, making conven- tional welding unsuitable and mechanical fastening a necessity for these mixed-material joints.


Making the Vehicle Go Surface topology on engine cylinder liners has an im-


portant influence on functional performance and is the signature of the process conditions. In NAMRC paper #4503, French researchers present a comparative study of 2D and 3D characterization methods of cylinder liner texture, which is generated by a process called plateau honing, a succession


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208