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Workforce


The Latest Challenge Tis new four-year competition will build upon a rich his-


tory of giving each team of students the chance to design and integrate advanced technology powertrains and controls into a GM-donated production Chevrolet Camaro with the goal of minimizing the environmental impact of personal transpor- tation to create a more sustainable future. Much like global automakers, the program will explore the same technologies that the automotive industry is using or investigating. Since its debut as a 1967 model, the Camaro has been a


leader in design, technology and performance. It’s exciting that the students get the opportunity to work on this car, but the opportunity definitely will have its difficulties. Tey’ll need to maintain the muscle and perfor- mance expected from this iconic American vehicle, while push- ing the boundaries in energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions levels. Te 16 teams


competing in the four-year-long (2014- 18) event are: • Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ)


ment Process (VDP) to design and integrate their advanced technology solutions into the Camaros. Te VDP is altered to fit the academic timeline for EcoCAR 3 and then used by organizers and teams to develop the timeline for design, integration, refinement and market engagement of the team’s vehicle design. Te first year of the VDP is an essential foundation for


establishing a successful design, which in the EcoCAR 3 case launched in fall 2014. Year One emphasizes vehicle design through modeling and simulation. Tese first-year activities prepare teams for the vehicle integration and refinement tasks in subsequent years of the competition as well as form the basis for the Year One competition. But the students


• California State Univer- sity (Los Angeles)


The Mississippi State University team confers in a garage at GM’s Milford (MI) Proving Grounds during EcoCAR 2.


• Colorado State University (Fort Collins, CO) • Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (Daytona Beach, FL)


• Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta) • McMaster University (Hamilton, ON, Canada) • Mississippi State University (Starkville, MS) • Ohio State University (Columbus, OH) • Pennsylvania State University (University Park, PA) • University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL) • University of Tennessee (Knoxville, TN) • University of Washington (Seattle) • University of Waterloo (Waterloo, ON, Canada) • Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA) • Wayne State University (Detroit) • West Virginia University (Morgantown, WV)


Real-World Processes, Real-World Results Teams will follow GM’s real-world Vehicle Develop-


86 Motorized Vehicle Manufacturing


can’t just look at things from an engi- neering standpoint. In order to be suc- cessful in EcoCAR 3, universities must employ a strong multidisciplinary initiative beyond mechanical, electri- cal, computer and soſtware engineer- ing. AVTC students oſten use advanced soſtware and model- based design tools to design components, which eventually get


fabricated and integrated into the student vehicle during Years Two and Tree. Te program also requires them to reach out to commu-


nications and management students. Our emphasis on these areas truly imitates a real-world automotive industry environ- ment. Having this component of execution truly prepares the students for a product launch and helps them understand how project management of a program, along with marketing and communications, are vital to a company’s bottom line. A competition event at the end of academic Year One will


bring all student teams together to assess each team’s design process, component selection and vehicle configuration. Here, they’ll have the opportunity to win nearly $100,000 in industry-funded awards. Moving through the next three years, the teams will integrate powertrain components and control- lers into their Camaros. We’re looking to develop highly skilled students with a


strong understanding of advanced vehicle technologies as well as marketing techniques that will prepare them to lead


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