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rial. “Within it we have several focus sectors, such as the au- tomotive industry, general industry and construction, with components such as engine blocks, wheel hubs, pumps, and differential or gearbox housings,” he added.


Because the inserts are indexed radially and are reversible as well, the F4045 tool has 14 usable cutting edges, optimizing cast iron machining productivity.


Soft-Cutting yet Sturdy Te use of cast iron to permit thinner


engine walls was mentioned earlier. Machin- ing these thinner walls, however, typically induces vibration. Tat’s why tools that are both soſt-cutting and sturdy are needed. To attain that mix these tools need to have certain characteristics, the first of which is a high-performance coating. Kussmaul pointed to the latest iteration of his company’s Tiger•tec Silver as just such a coating. Why? “It’s a new aluminum oxide coating with an optimized


microstructure that enables increased thermal wear resistance, and provides maximum tool life and cutting speeds,” he said. “In addition, it has been given a special surface treatment


shape and are therefore a job for a milling machine or machin- ing center. One of the most common operations is the face milling of sealing and attachment surfaces, such as cylinder


head sur- faces on engine


blocks. “In the au-


tomotive indus- try, it is important to process as many


surfaces as possible in the shortest time and with process reliability. Large milling cutters with multiple cutting edges are required for the


appropriate metal removal rates,” says Wolfgang Vötsch, mill- ing specialist in product management at Walter. Vötsch points to his company’s F4045 as a prime example


of the type of tool required to maximize cast iron machining productivity and process reliability. Te F4045’s inserts provide


The auto industry has pushed for more efficient and reliable ways to machine this vital but difficult material.


which converts the tensile stresses in the coating into com- pressive stresses.” Tis is designed to increase the toughness of the cutting tool material, which boosts reliability of the cutting edge, particularly when machining cast skins. Both the wear resistance and toughness are therefore greater than with conventional coatings. Kussmaul stressed that the proper insert geometry is also


crucial as the macro and microgeometry of a cutting edge have a significant influence on chip formation and, therefore, on the resulting cutting forces. Choosing the right geometry for the application, preferably one with a ground contact sur- face to ensure secure seating of the indexable insert, is crucial. “An advanced coating together with the optimized geometries and today’s new cutting tool material grades can lead to maxi- mum cutting performance and an increase in tool life of up to 75%,” he said.


Multiple Edges for Milling Perhaps the majority of workpieces encountered in cast iron machining, and generally also the largest, are cubic in


14 usable cutting edges because the symmetrical indexable inserts are not only indexed radially, but also are reversible. Tese characteristics make for a highly efficient cast iron cutter, which drives down cutting edge costs. In addition, a positive overall geometry provides low cutting forces and reduced power consumption. Another desirable feature in a milling cutter is an insert


wedge clamping system so that the indexable insert can be fitted precisely and securely in its seat. With this design the clamping wedge pivots to the side aſter just a few turns of the clamping screw to enable quick and easy access to the index- able insert. “Handling is of crucial importance for a tool with many us-


able cutting edges,” explained Vötsch. “If the indexable inserts cannot be turned around or indexed quickly and easily by hand, much valuable time is lost.”


Edited by Yearbook Editor James D. Sawyer from material provided by Walter USA LLC.


Motorized Vehicle Manufacturing 63


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