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NEWS Training ■ Chilling:


Cooling of a substance without freezing it ■ Freezing:


Solidification phase change of a liquid or the liquid content of a substance, usually due to cooling


■ Cold Chain:


Series of actions and equipment applied to maintain a product within a specified low-temperature range from harvest/production to consumption.


The Smith Brothers Stores branch in Bristol has recently supported Taylor Darby, a first-year mechanical apprentice employed at TClarke, by providing him with Rothenberger tools.


TClarke is an established provider of integrated construction services including infrastructure, M&E contracting, residential and accommodation, technologies, and facilities management. The firm – like SBS – is an ardent believer in the benefits of apprenticeships, and pairs each of its trainees with a skilled mentor who has already successfully passed their own apprenticeship.


Since the introduction of the


Appreticeship Levy, SBS has both upskilled existing staff and taken on multiple apprentices within the last year. With the SBS workforce now exceeding 300 individuals, the business sees the Levy as a tool to drive growth and is continuing to recruit trainees across a range of areas.


Two examples of courses currently being studied by SBS apprentices include supply chain warehouse operations and digital marketing.


For over a year, a group of experts from the International Institute of Refrigeration (IIR) and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)


have been working together to establish common definitions of five essential words characterising the refrigeration sector.


Both organisations have now come to an agreement on the following definitions: ■ Cooling:


– Removal of heat, usually resulting in a lower temperature and/or phase change – Lowering temperature ■ Refrigeration:


– Cooling of a space, substance or system to lower and/or maintain its temperature below the ambient one – removed heat is rejected at a higher temperature – Artificial cooling.


Jean-Luc Dupont, head of the IIR’s Scientific and Technical Information Department, said: “It was important that the differences that might exist in these definitions between the IIR and ASHRAE be erased for more consistency. It now seems important for us to reach even greater harmonisation on an international level in order to establish universal definitions.”


To this end, the IIR has called on all national and regional organisations and associations to adopt and disseminate these definitions. For its part, the Institute will disseminate these definitions as widely as possible, adopt them in all its publications, and promote them, in particular, at the next International Congress of Refrigeration to be held in Montreal, Canada, from 24-30 August 2019.


The IIR, like ASHRAE, has its own dictionary. It contains 4,300 words across all fields of refrigeration – including air conditioning – and their translations into 11 languages. It also includes the definitions of these terms in English and in French.


8 May 2019 www.acr-news.com


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