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SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE example, the installation of the latest


electronically commutated (EC) energy saving fans or increasing filter performance.


Besides, although fitting a replacement AHU might, on the face of it, seem the right option, you will still be constrained by the rest of the HVAC system – including maximum air volume capacity and existing duct sizes. Changing capacities might therefore entail modifying services and steel work to handle a new unit. However, there is one knock-down


advantage of refurbishment that virtually makes it a no-brainer – heat recovery legislation contained in Ecodesign Directive rules means that, where AHUs are replaced, the new kit will almost certainly need to be much larger to accommodate heat recovery. All new residential and non-residential ventilation units are now subject to the requirements of the Ecodesign Directive. This establishes a framework for the setting of eco-design requirements for energy-related products and their implementation.


As of January 2016, all ventilation and fan products have had to comply with Ecodesign and must be labelled with the relevant CE marking. The directive is designed to drive


carbon emission reductions and help the EU achieve its energy and climate change objectives. Equipment that does not meet the defined minimum requirements can no longer be marketed in the EU.


In most industrialised countries, HVAC


equipment is responsible for around a third of total energy consumption. The main purpose of heat recovery systems is to mitigate the energy consumption of buildings for heating, cooling and ventilation by recovering the waste heat. Under the directive, AHUs must adhere to certain energy efficiency standards. To achieve these, they often require some form of heat recovery, whether with a thermal wheel, crossflow heat exchanger or run-around coils. Since these need to be attached to the AHU, this makes the units bulkier and increases their footprint; new units are typically 20% larger than existing plant. This is to cope with the increased heat recovery surface required to achieve complian ce.


However, the legislation applies only to AHUs installed after 01 January 2016. Refurbishment comes under separate guidance which means you do not have to comply with Ecodesign, so the AHUs can remain smaller.


Refurbishment can entail anything from simply re-sealing condensate pans, chamber floors and other surfaces to the wholesale replacement of controls, or even a complete overhaul – and the savings can be dramatic. For example, on a recent AHU upgrade project, we calculated that we could provide an estimated 22% to 33% energy saving by upgrading the fans.


There were also additional savings on drive belts, motor and fan pulleys and bush replacemen t, as well as much reduced maintenance time.


On another job, we quoted to replace the fans with new direct drive EC energy efficient fans complete with new auto changeover function and potentiometer. New electrical isolators, air pressure switches and air flow tubing were also to be installed to match the new fan design.


On top of this, general refurbishment


included full deep clean , replacement backdraft shutters, replacement internal insulation lining and new roof plate fixings as the existing are damaged.


We calculated that all this would result in an energy saving of 28% to 38%.


Elitech


27


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