search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
COLD STORES


u pgrades or investments. However, in the highly efficient and competitive world of cold stores, this can result in a 5% increase in energy usage. I t must be noted that while using extra energy, i t could create a net cost reduction compared to o perating at full capacity during peak electricity r ate periods. However, this is not a fully


sustainable solution and risks compromising the goods, which means that pre-cooling is not a real option for long-term operations and is simply a stop-gap solution.


Another strategy is capacity limitation. This m eans that rather than turning equipment off o utright during peak electricity price periods, a baseline level of cooling is always maintained. The shortfall in the cooling capacity is then caught back up by running with excess capacity f ollowing the peak period.


R efrigeration systems are inherently oversized t o ensure they can handle peak-load during the hottest parts of the year. Following a spike in cooling demand, rather than trying to recover the temperature as fast as possible, this recovery can be slowed down to ensure that machinery does not operate at maximum capacity during peak hours. In practical terms, capacity-limiting control can be achieved by limiting the evaporator


coil fan speed following a demand spike.


F ollowing this, each evaporator coil zone would be released in a staggered sequence until the system i s once again operating as usual.


This lag can mean that the recovery process can be spread later into the day, where electricity prices are more favourable. Capacity limiting d uring the recovery period is a strategy which r equires a fine balance to ensure that the space t emperature can be completey pulled down b efore the following peak day hours. As ever, the products must be kept at a suitable temperature during this entire process, which sets a hard limit to how much of the cooling capacity can be spread out.


T he most attractive load-shifting strategy can b e achieved using PCM. TES modules are filled using PCM to suit a given cold room operational temperature. These modules can either be installed as part of the cold store building fabric, such as by hanging tubes from ceilings, or by i nstalling directly into the racking itself. It is possible to shift around 1.7kWh/m 2 technology.


using this


TES allows the operator to spread the cooling load over a 24 hour period, without the concern of overcooling any goods. This strategy can allow


for almost all of the peak load to be shifted into the night, where electricity prices are low and high COP leads to highly efficient compressor operation.


Through more efficient compressor operation, i t is possible to reduce electricity consumption by as much as 15-25% alone, compared to peak daytime operation. This benefit is further compounded by cheap night tariffs.


As the TES is entirely static, it offers full standby capabilities once charged. There is no n eed for complex control systems because it w orks using the physical properties of the PCM itself. Should refrigeration equipment fail and the internal temperature of the warehouse begin to rise, the PCM will immediately begin to melt and absorb that excess heat.


This strategy allows a cold store to almost c ompletely avoid day-peak electricity rates, and most importantly, helps maintain the best temperature for the goods inside the cold store so quality is never compromised. The key drawback of this strategy is the necessary upfront costs associated with its implementation, and the k nowledge gap between designers and operators, because there is not a one-size fits all solution for each and every cold store.


Guntner


37


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92