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COLD STORES


global warming potential (GWP) of 3. Gary Fuller, key account manager at


Hubbard Products, says: “Monoblock units are ideal for small or medium-sized cold rooms or cold stores, they are relatively easy to install, consisting of a single, self-contained unit, and offer extremely versatile use. The ceiling-mounted assembly leaves the space inside the cold room completely free. Many SMEs and artisan producers of food products manufacture and store on a just-in-time footing and haven’t had the n eed or capacity for stockpiling; now with the potential prospect of supply routes being disrupted and all third- party storage fully booked for months ahead, creating a manageable and economically viable dedicated storage facility makes good sense.” Hubbard Products can also supply chillers and cold storage assets with cloud-based monitoring systems to ensure reliability and optimum performance.


Dougie Stoddart believes that whilst the current scenario is challenging for many users of cold storage, getting the correct solution now will enable them to become more flexible and self-reliant in the long-term. He says: “Getting your cold store solution right, and


getting it right first time is the only way to deal with challenging circumstances. At Hubbard Products we offer a range of services and free advice to customers, specifiers, consultants and contractors to ensure they


make the right decisions that will support their businesses for years ahead. With over 50 years of experience and the backing of a global organisation, we are well placed to share knowledge, expertise and industry foresights.”


Elitech


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