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SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE


This shows that there are some equipment owners out there that aren’t getting the message about service and maintenance. It’s possible they feel that paying an engineer to service their equipment is not money well spent, or they simply don’t understand the importance.


Refrigeration and air


conditioning systems are, generally, very tough pieces of equipment, designed and


engineered to withstand all sorts of abuse and keep on running in all kinds of environments. This is great in most respects, but it can lead to complacency about the need for maintenance.


Without regular maintenance an air conditioner loses around 5% of its original efficiency for each year of operation. This means that a 3.5kW unit installed four years ago may be functioning like a 2.8kW today. Most of that lost efficiency


can be recovered through regular maintenance, and studies have shown that with a good service and maintenance routine a unit will maintain up to 95% of its original efficiency.


This means that the cost of a regular service is recovered very quickly in savings on the monthly electricity bill and reduced repair costs.


Dirt is the enemy to any


indoor or outdoor unit as far as efficiency is concerned.


Dirt collects on the coils, which affects their ability to absorb and reject heat, which as we all know will increase the running costs of the equipment, and reduce the system life.


A build-up of dirt 1.5mm thick on the coil can cause up to a 60% increase in direct electricity costs. Regularly cleaning both indoor and outdoor coils with appropriate products will


maintain the efficiency of the equipment.


Indoor air quality (IAQ) can be an issue with air conditioning.


Building owners have a duty of care to ensure that the


occupants are breathing in clean air.


There is nothing worse for business owners than staff illness costing money due to poorly maintained air conditioning. By regularly having indoor AC coils and filters


cleaned with a disinfectant coil cleaner, indoor air quality will be improved.


Blockages in drain lines can cause water to spill out of the unit, causing water damage to the building. The blockage could be caused by physical debris or bacterial slime in the drip tray. In AC, this can also affect the IAQ and cause the unit to smell. Condensate trays should be cleaned and visually inspected for excessive corrosion and leaks, and drain lines checked to ensure they are not blocked. There are various products


available to unblock drain lines, such as liquid drain un-blockers or, alternatively, products that purge the blockage out of the drain line.


If a condensate pump is fitted, it should be checked and cleaned to ensure correct and efficient operation.


Debris and sludge should be removed from pump reservoirs and pump inlets should be checked and cleaned.


To help prevent the build-up of slime in condensate trays, there are products available to treat this as it occurs.


It is also important to visually let the customer know an


engineer has conducted a good quality service and maintenance visit. Often, the work engineers do can go unnoticed or not fully understood by the customer. Although some equipment owners may not understand or appreciate the need for a service and maintenance program, what we’ve highlighted here is that ultimately it will save them mon ey.


www.acr-news.com 25


Recover FASTER Work SMARTER Comply BETTER


A-Gas


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