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T


here is without doubt a lot happening in the industry – the internet of things has fi nally caught up with us and all sorts of equipment can be optimised and monitored from your smart


phones or tablet. Refrigerant gas prices and developments are ongoing issues along with what’s going to happen to quotas once Brexit happens, and we all seem to be preparing for that, stocking up and making the best plans possible to accommodate whatever happens, which is of course both tough and costly. But at the heart of the ACR industry are the people that make, create, install and maintain systems that are crucial to so many sectors – and people are the one resource that this industry needs more of. There are now a number of initiatives such as World Refrigeration Day on 26 June, Skillfridge with its apprentices and the Women in RACHP Network which supports diversity in all its forms – these are powerful tools with which to help attract new people. This is the one of the biggest little industries in the world, populated


by some incredibly passionate people doing exceptionally innovative things and the whole world should know that, and that is also what the ACR News Awards are all about. A big thank you to all who entered, all who judged and voted, and those supported the event, and huge congratulations to those who won on the night.


Lynn Sencicle Managing Editor ACR News


Judges


Roger Borer BA (Hons), FInstR has over 45 years’ experience working in refrigeration engineering, retail engineering services/construction project management and general business management. He is currently Executive Offi cer for the Building Controls Industry Association (BCIA). Roger has a BA (Hons)


degree in Business Studies and is a Fellow of the Institute of Refrigeration.


Martyn Cooper, commercial manager at FETA, joined the Federation in May 2015 after a 37 year long career in the chemical industry. His role now includes supporting various sections within several of the member associations of FETA; BRA, HPA and HEVAC. He has also been involved in the launch and promotion of the recent BRA Putting into Use Replacement Refrigerants (PURR) report. Graeme Fox has been a contractor for over 20 years running his own small family business specialising in building services; air conditioning, heat pumps and climate control. He has served on the BESA Council since 2005 and represented contractors at AREA since 2004, as well as serving with the IoR and ACRIB. Colin Goodwin joined BSRIA in 2018 and leads the technical development, delivery and focus of BSRIA, his role also encompasses managing BSRIA technical input to regulatory, legislative and parliamentary activity, including energy policies and building regulations. Colin qualifi ed as a chartered engineer


2019


in 1995 and is also a registered European Engineer. He is both a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers and Liveryman in the Worshipful Company of Engineers. He has held board and senior manager positions in FM, energy services, and property & construction management. Bringing to BSRIA a wide experience in property operations, construction and energy management with both client and contractor businesses. Richard Merritt has 25 years’ experience in the industry having started out as an apprentice with Haden Young. In 2001 he took over the family business AC Solutions Group as managing director. Richard is Hertfordshire Branch Chairman of BESA as well as a member of the BESA specialist RACHP group executive committee. A member of the Institute of Refrigeration, Licentiate at the Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers and Engineering Technician status at the Engineering Council.


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