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STORAGE


■ Keep food and medical goods sealed at all times. Store refrigerated foods in covered c ontainers and check for spoilage e very 24 hours.


■ Always use pallets to prevent food from coming into contact with the floor.


■ Make sure you differentiate between products requiring dry storage, refrigerated or chilled storage and frozen or cold


storage. Different foods require a d ifferent storage environment. ■ Ensure buildings are kept as insulated as possible by keeping doors, windows and other openings closed.


Other tips


Generally speaking, you’ll need to ensure that:


■ Frozen foods are stored at a minimum of -18°C.


■ Dry foods or products are kept between 10°C and 20°C. ■ Any area in which food or


t emperature-sensitive products are being stored should have thermometers present for hourly checks. This should be recorded in a log book in line with health and safety regulations.


■ The level of relative humidity in a dry storage space should not exceed 15%.


■ Never store food or


pharmaceutical goods in direct sunlight.


■ Ensure you adopt a ‘first in, first out’ approach to storage and distribution.


The following conditions are not conducive to a food storage application and should be addressed immediately:


■ Holes in windows, walls or open doorways.


■ Roof leaks or loose foundations that increase the chances of water ingress and dampness.


■ The use of pesticides or other chemicals that could be harmful to meat or produce.


■ Standing water or the presence of rubbish bins.


Sizing guides S izing guides


W hen assessing the area of an application that needs to be


controlled, you should consider the total volume of the area and deduct the volume taken by the products being stored. Once this has been calculated, a simple rule of thumb w ould be to allow around 60W of cooling or heating per cubic metre based on the building being well- insulated.


W here humidity is the critical f actor, single units can keep dry a reas of up to 20,000m³ and remove in excess of 1,500 litres of moisture every 24 hours. In many cases, the use of multiple smaller units may be considered a more convenient solution due to greater fl exibility being afforded.


There are however many factors that should be considered before selecting the required equipment. These include:


■ The external ambient temperature.


■ The quality of the building’s insulation.


■ The number of air changes caused by doors opening/closing. ■ The drop or increase in


temperature required to reach the desired conditions.


■ The presence of any equipment operating in the storage area.


■ Solar gain.


For these reasons, it is strongly recommended that you take up the option of a full site survey conducted by an experienced technician.


The sensitivity of pharmaceutical products means it is imperative that they are appropriately stored, with tablets, capsules and powders particularly vulnerable to humidity and absorbing moisture. In such scenarios, the safest and most effective way of stockpiling said products is by using dehumidifier units to maintain a desirable level of relative humidity.


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