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SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE


Keeping equipment ship shape at Grange Shipping


R


egularly servicing and cleaning air conditioning equipment helps to optimise performance, energy efficiency and helps to guarantee longer equipment lifespan. Air conditioning systems can provide perfect conditions for microbial growth. Moisture, darkness and warmth are three key ingredients for microbial growth and these naturally occurring contaminants use the moisture present in air conditioning systems as a breeding ground. This growth is accelerated when warmth is added, where fungi and bacteria can colonise and sometime proliferate to become harmful concentrations if left unattended. Pitkin & Ruddock is an air conditioning and refrigeration specialist based in the UK with over 60 years’ experience of delivering complete temperature controlled solutions including service, maintenance, design and installation. Pitkin & Ruddock was carrying out a regular scheduled maintenance visit at Grange Shipping, based near Felixstowe.


Grange Shipping was established in 1979 and is today heavily involved in the movement of a wide range of cargo types including paper, steel, tea, fresh and frozen produce.


32 May 2019


The maintenance engineer from Pitkin & Ruddock investigated an issue which had been highlighted, where a Mitsubishi Electric under ceiling mounted air conditioning unit was giving off bad odours in one of their offices. The coils on the indoor unit required cleaning and Pitkin & Ruddock was looking for a professional cleaning product that would do the job well and to the satisfaction of its customer. Recognising the need for a high-performance cleaning product, Climalife regional sales manager Robin Attawia recommended the Frionett cleaning range to Pitkin & Ruddock. The maintenance engineer attending Grange Shipping was advised to test the Frionett Activ as the product was the most suitable for the issue reported. Frionett is a disinfecting, degreasing and deodorising cleanser with a fresh scent that can be used to clean refrigeration and air conditioning equipment.


Before cleaning commenced, windows were opened to ensure there was good ventilation and the power supply was disconnected. Frionett Activ Concentrate was diluted one part to four parts water and shaken well before use. The cleaning fluid was sprayed directly along the coil from top


to bottom to remove all dirt and grime present. The dirty residue washed into the drain. Before moving on to clean the pumps, the drain was flushed through with water.


The maintenance engineer found that the air conditioning system was working more efficiently and the cleaning product left the area very clean. When the unit was switched on, there was no longer an unpleasant smell coming from it. Grange Shipping was happy the issue was resolved and Pitkin & Ruddock have recommended that this forms part of their regular maintenance programme.


Pitkin & Ruddock’s Ipswich service and maintenance administrator, Debra Low, said: “Planned preventative maintenance minimises the risk of business interruption by highlighting impending problems before they become costly issues. They help to improve energy efficiency and enhance system optimisation for improved performance as well as ensuring you fully comply with your F-Gas regulation obligations. Business benefits for end users include increased reliability, reduced running costs, quicker payback periods and potentially longer life, plus less carbon emissions.”


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