This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Edited by Katie Barnes. Email: katiebarnes@leisuremedia.com


LIGHTWEIGHTS CHAIN REACTION FOR


SHOE COMPANY Chain mail has been used to create a form of shoe which is designed to improve posture while helping wearers feel “closer to nature”. The PaleoBarefoots are based on the same


principle as other barefoot shoes, whereby minimising heel striking is said to aid with posture, injury prevention and improved running technique (see HCM July 13, p38). Unlike other trainer-like models, however, they


enable the wearer to experience more natural sensations – soil, gravel, moss, grass, leaves and even water – although they’re not recommended for road use. The fi ne mesh is also said to protect against glass shards and other sharp objects. Manufactured by German-based company


GoSt Barefoots, there are three different types of PaleoBarefoots: one model is suitable for strolling and light hiking, one for extreme terrain, and one is an all-rounder. A pair costs €165-€192. Details: http://portal.gost-barefoots.com/en/


SMELLING OUT THE TRUTH OF GYM KITS


More than half of gym goers admit to not washing their kit until after their third workout – and women are the worst offenders, according to a survey by Sweatband.com Considering this, it’s ironic that


44 per cent of the 1,456 survey respondents said they’d been put off their exercise because of smelly people next to them at the gym. The top excuses for not washing


kit more frequently included saving it for a bigger wash, not having a replacement kit and pure laziness. It was found that people were


least likely to wash their bottoms and socks compared to their tops.


Jump at the chance to lose weight


Skipping could be the key to keeping hunger at bay, based on a small study published in the journal Appetite. A team at Waseda University in Japan


recruited 15 men in their mid-20s who carried out three separate tests – based on short bursts of skipping, biking or remaining completely sedentary – following 12 hours of fasting. During the tests, the men were


frequently asked how hungry they felt 98


and blood samples were also analysed for the presence of a hunger hormone. While both activities made the men


feel less hungry than doing nothing, skipping was the most effective. The researchers believe that the up


and down movement and load-bearing characteristic of skipping disturbed the stomach, which possibly had an impact on hormones that are linked to controlling the appetite.


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


GETTING SPOOKED ON NIGHT-TIME HIKES


Spooky sites recently provided the backdrop for two 30km night-time treks, organised in celebration of Hallowe’en. The Fright Hike charity walks took place in the UK’s Epping Forest and Sherwood Forest. Epping Forest, a reputed haunt of the ghost of the


murderous highwayman Dick Turpin, is also home to the legendary Hangman’s Hill that’s said to have been used be to hang criminals. Meanwhile Robin Hood’s famous hideaway, Sherwood Forest, has a medieval- era atmosphere and is home to Rufford Abbey, one of the most haunted places in England. Teams or individuals were challenged to


complete the treks in six hours – tough courses which the organisers promised would be “murder on your muscles”. Details: www.fright-hike.com


November/December 2013 © Cybertrek 2013


© SHUTTERSTOCK.COM/TOPSELLER


© SHUTTERSTOCK.COM/OSTILL


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