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About Global MONITOR


Global MONITOR is a comprehensive set of resources for global foresights and trends that provides insight into the global and local forces shaping the business environment, consumers and brands. The resource includes data and analysis from a consumer survey that covers 28,000 respondents across 21 countries.


in:calories out equation, whereby physical activity also plays a role. Indeed, helping consumers across all


age groups to make choices that lead to living healthier lifestyles is a challenge the fi tness industry needs to accept, focusing on driving innovation, creating incentives and inspiring motivation. Companies and brands that support consumers in navigating the wellbeing landscape will unlock new sources of growth for decades and inspire consumer loyalty.


The consumer response Part of consumers’ increased responsibility over their individual health is the recognition that emotional and spiritual health are as important as physical health in achieving overall wellness. This holistic approach to wellness has led consumers to adopt a wide range of measures with the aim of making themselves feel happy, healthy and strong. Global MONITOR (see above) data


reveals that just over half (52 per cent) of people take steps to improve their health, regardless of whether they feel ill or not: a self-managing approach to wellbeing that echoes the preventative mindset we’re now seeing on the rise across the majority of global markets. However, despite this, fewer than half of consumers worldwide say they are satisfi ed with their emotional and physical wellbeing. Understanding consumers’


approaches to health can be complicated, as they are often very personal and heavily infl uenced by cultural nuances. Global MONITOR uses a metaphor to explore this complexity and visualise the potential strategies people may use. We ask consumers: ‘How do you think of your body?’ and offer them three options.


November/December 2013 © Cybertrek 2013 Below 50%


Figure 1 – The appeal of holistic health


Above 70% 60 - 70% 50 - 60%


Percentages of national populations feeling ‘tree’ best describes their body – something to be nurtured as part of an ongoing holistic approach to health


The Car is the metaphor for those


people who see their body as a machine in which the component parts can be fi xed. Among this group, strategies tend to be short-term and reactive. Those who identify with the Fortress


see their body as something they have to strengthen and defend against external attack. This is also short-term, but predominantly a proactive approach. Finally, the Tree is for those who see


their body as something they nurture, taking an ongoing holistic approach to managing health. This is a much more long-term, proactive strategy. It is this fi nal option, with its holistic


approach to managing health, that’s here to stay: the percentage of Global MONITOR respondents identifying with the tree rose from 50 per cent in 2006 to 56 per cent in 2013 (car fell from 20 to 15 per cent, while fortress went up just 1 per cent, from 28 to 29 per cent). This growing interest in a holistic approach is evident across all markets,


although there remain big differences: in Thailand, Japan and South Korea, over 70 per cent of people picked tree; in South Africa, Colombia and Germany, tree came in at 60–70 per cent. (See Figure 1, above) Meanwhile in Spain, Italy, Brazil and


India, tree registered between 50 and 60 per cent, but with fortress also important; in China, tree was also 50–60 per cent but car came out above average; and markets including the UK, US, Canada and Australia remained below 50 per cent for tree, with car above average. Interestingly, tree logged above average responses in Russia. (See Figure 2, p58) One of the big shifts registered in


the above fi ndings has occurred in some Asian markets, where a holistic approach was traditionally more of a culturally embedded behaviour. We’re beginning to see movement towards a more defensive strategy, however: a 10 per cent shift from tree to fortress in India, for example, indicating a


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