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GLOBAL HEALTH TRENDS


more mixed approach to self-health management. We suspect this could this be a response to recent risks of contracting foreign-derived viruses such as bird flu.


The market response Whether consumers view their bodies as cars, fortresses or trees, opportunities abound to support those working to optimise their overall wellbeing. There has been significant innovation in this space, with some of the emerging hotspots including innovations that help people to manage their mental acuity, boost the body’s renewal processes and protect themselves against disease. Current innovations in the market


include Kinohimistu, a lutein drink from Japan that claims to preserve optical health; from the US, drinks that (once ingested) help to keep skin looking young while asleep; and Vigo, a chewing gum from Sweden that’s said to increase mental performance – to mention a few. Meanwhile, in the space of self-


monitoring, devices such as Fitband and Fuelband can help consumers to track and potentially optimise their health and fitness levels. However, the full impact of such devices will only be realised if consumers are motivated by improving their records rather than passively reading the data fed back to them. At the Israel Institute of Technology,


professor Hossam Haick is developing an artificial nose that can detect molecules in human breath that are symptomatic of head, neck and lung cancers. If this product gets to market, it could give consumers even more insight and control over their healthcare.


The future will see an increase in corporate wellness offers


Which of the following best describes how you think of your body – car, fortress, tree? (indices highlighting above average market differences)


Also, 3D printing of bespoke


transplant organs is on the horizon in the UK – a capability that could support those who take more of a ‘car’ approach to their personal maintenance.


Future opportunities The business landscape is changing, with an opportunity to reframe wellbeing and move brands into the lifestyle choice space, where there are more points to connect, serve and support consumers in their quest for better health. We will see an increase in corporate wellness schemes as employers take an


active interest in employees’ wellbeing as part of a commercial agenda – as well as their duty of care. Meanwhile, our ability to collect and


analyse big data about individual health indicators will deliver solutions at mass and personalised levels. With the cost of decoding an individual genome likely to fall from between US$10,000 and US$25,000 to just US$1,000 within the next two years, we can expect to see the personalised health market explode. Our message to companies and


brands is simple: seize the opportunity. There has never been a better time for brands to shape the future of wellness and assist consumers in their quest to live better and healthier lives. The global momentum behind


wellness is poised to impact everything about the way we live our lives, from the products we buy to the places we work and play. ●


The Futures Company is an award-winning global strategic insight and innovation consultancy with expertise in foresight and futures. It unlocks new sources of growth for its clients through consultancy, global insight and a range of subscription solutions. The Futures Company is a Kantar company within WPP, with teams in Europe, North America, Latin America and Asia, and was formed through the integration of The Henley Centre, Yankelovich and TRU. Twitter @FuturesCo Web www.thefuturescompany.com


58 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital November/December 2013 © Cybertrek 2013 Figure 2 - Health strategies around the world


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