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Glasgow Business . 43 www.glasgowchamberofcommerce.com


DAVID DALE


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founder of New Lanark and founding father of the Chamber movement


By this time the business employed 70,000 Indians and a large staff of managers, assistant managers and superintendents. At the time, the business was the main Indian tea supplier to the UK market with five main subsidiary companies managing the tea growing side of the enterprise. During the 1930s the company expanded its tea business into


Africa, establishing estates and production plants which still form a major part of the business today.


The Finlay Indian tea growing


business continued until 1982, when its last tea estates were sold to the Tata Tea Company of Bombay. Towards the end of the 20th


century, the cotton interests, which had been built up by Kirkman Finlay, were


However, by the early 1990s,


Finlay returned its focus to tea. The Finlay business still


replaced by financial services, onshore and offshore oil services, and a wide range of other businesses.


trades worldwide in black tea, and with changing tastes in instant tea and decaffeinated tea, it still manages estates in Kenya and Sri Lanka. The company now produces


46 million kg of tea a year from 37,000 acres.


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