This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
63


235


235.ROCHESTER, John Wilmot, Earl of. The farce of Sodom. By the Right honourable Earl of Rochester. Written for the Royal company of Whoremasters, and printed a-new upon the three hundredth anniversary of the untimely demise of our noble author in the thirty-third year of his life. With sets and costumes suitable for theatrical perfortmaces designed by Donald Friend. Melbourne. Gryphon Books. 1980.


£998


Folio, in original half black calf over red linen boards, lettered in gilt on spine and upper board. pp. [8], 65; 17 semi-erotic mounted colour plates, one other mounted plate (not coloured), mounted colour vignette on title, other illustrations throughout in text (11 full- page), colour illustrated endpapers, all by Donald Friend.


Limited edition of 250 numbered copies signed by Donald Friend. “Rochester’s lyrical, lewd & licentious poems were circulated only in manuscript during his lifetime. The earliest printed editions appeared a year after his death. But the “Farce of Sodom” was never printed in England. For centuries its fame (or notoriety) depended on crude continental imprints. consequently in England, “Sodom” was a sort of obscene literary rumour like Sullivan’s (or was it Gilbert’s?) suppressed “Sod’s opera”, except to those who had privileged access to a few manuscript copies, only two of which are known to have survived until the present day. Thus this edition is issued with a handwritten text in keeping with the manuscript tradition” (Editor’s note).


236


236.ROOSEVELT, Theodore. African Game Trails; An Account of the African Wanderings of an American hunter-naturalist. new York and London, Syndicate Publishing Company, 1910.


£200


8vo. original tan cloth, upper cover and spine titled in black, the cover incorporating a dramatic scene, blocked in pale green, crimson, tan, and gilt, the spine awith the title inside a gilt panel; pp. xvii + 583 (inc. 49pp. “Appendices”), with a photographic frontispiece of Roosevelt, over 200 photographs, and 8 coloured “action” collotypes after drawings by Phillip R. Goodwin, with a wood-engraved map; spine a little sunned, very good.


First “colour Plate” edition: in the First edition, first issue, Goodwin’s plates were in black and white. czech mentions at least 4 copies of the first edition that he has seen with different covers. czech: “This [story], with its larger than life sportsman, was almost continuously in print until the 1930s. in British East Africa, Roosevelt hunted lion and plains game on the Kapiti Plains, while in Bondoni hill country, he collected rhinoceros and giraffe. on Juja Farm, his son Kermit faced leopard, while Teddy bagged rhino and hippopotamus. on the Kamiti River, buffalo were were taken. near the Sotik, additional rhino and lion were hunted, with elephant bagged near mt. Kenia. on the Guaso nyiro, giraffe and a variety of plains game were shot. Further adventures included hunting elephant near Lake nyanza, rhino and plains game in the Lado, and eland on the nile. Roosevelt’s total bag was enormous even by the liberal standards of that era.”


Czech p. 138.


237. ROWLANDSON, Thomas (Illustrator) COMBE, William. The Dance of Life. A Poem. R. Ackermann. 1817.


£1,250


8vo., handsomely bound by Bayntun Riviere in full red morocco, boards with single gilt line panel enclosing a leaf and tendril border, spine lettered and panelled in gilt with gilt centre tools, all edges gilt, rich gilt turn-ins, marbled endpaper. With 26 handcoloured aquatint plates by Rowlandson. A very good copy.


First edition. “its twenty-six plates are full of cheerful and humourous satire of life and its follies.” martin hardie


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104