This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
16


the “figures and parts” (p. 18) of different species, rather than upon Platonic ideas of form or essence. his comments show a surprisingly modern conception of the animal nature of mankind: “i suppose it may be wonder’d at, that hitherto i have not mentioned mankind, who is so remarkable a creature, and Lord of all the rest; i confess, was i to have placed him where the Parts of his Body would most agree with those of the created Bodies mention’d in this Treatise, i must have set him in the middle of this chapter; but i suppose my Reader will excuse me, if i shew him so much regard, that i rather speak of him in the summing up of my Scale, than let him be encompass’d with wild Beasts.” (p.117). not only is this book of great scientific interest; the hand coloured plates, mainly of birds, animals and fish, are beautifully vibrant.


B.M.(n.H.) i, 220. ThE FiRST APPEARAncE oF ThE BRonTE SiSTERS - A commERciAL FLoP. 49. [BRONTE, Sisters]. Poems by currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell. Smith Elder and Co.1846 [but 1848]. £2,250


8vo., original light green vertically-ribbed cloth bound by Westley’s with their ticket, boards with floral border in blind with central lyre block in blind, spine lettered in gilt. Pp. iv + 165 + colophon + blank. Spine sunned, upper board slightly sunned, upper joint just beginning to split at head and foot, binding slightly cocked, very light stain to front free endpaper but generally a very good copy.


First Edition, second issue with cancel Smith Elder title page, in carter’s B variant binding (as usual), with errata slip but without initial advertisment leaf and publisher’s catalogue at the rear.


Published pseudonymously to deflect possible prejudice against female writers, this collection of verses is the first publication by the Bronte sisters and contains 19 poems by charlotte Brontë (“currer Bell”), and 21 each by Emily (“Ellis”) and Anne (“Acton”).


First published by Aylott Jones in 1846 in an edition of 1000 copies, the book was a resounding commercial flop, with only 39 copies sold. The remaining 961 copies were placed in storage and, following the success of charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, were reissued in october 1848 by Smith, Elder, and co. with a cancel title page showing their name as the publishers but with the date unaltered. The book was still slow to sell, however, and Smith Elder had only sold 279 copies by 1853. By 1855 they had sold a further 126 copies. There was then a binding up of 450 in 1857 to coincide with the publication of Gaskell’s Life of Bronte.


From the library of Ernest hamilton Sharp with his book plate engraved by Allan Wyon, the renowned medal and coin engraver who co-authored with his brother, Alfred Benjamin Wyon, the first major study of the ‘Great Seals of England’, published in 1887.


50. BROOKE, Jocelyn. The Wild orchids of Britain. The Bodley Head. 1950.


£220


4to. original cloth and dustwrapper; pp. 139, frontispiece (repeating plate 23) and 40 colour plates by Gavin Bone with additional drawings by Muirhead and Stephen Bone; wrapper faded to top with wear to spine, otherwise very good, especially internally. Provenance: inscribed to ffep by the author to Michael Legat (1923-2011), publisher, mainly as Editorial Director of corgi Books, and romantic novelist.


50


First edition. The edition was limited to 1140 numbered copies; this copy is unnumbered. Gavin Bone, the illustrator of this book, was probably better known as an Anglo-Saxon scholar and translator of Beowulf but here showed another side to his talent by providing fresh and engaging watercolour drawings taken from living specimens. Bone died in of cancer aged 35 in 1942, leaving these illustrations behind; they were completed for this project by his father Sir muirhead Bone and his brother Stephen, both distinguished artists. This book is dedicated to Gavin and is a memorial to him, but it is also a comprehensive acount of Britain’s orchids that is enriched by Brooke’s expert text.


51. BROWNING, Elizabeth Barrett and Robert. Two Poems. Chapman & Hall. 1854.


£398 8vo. original printed wrappers; pp. 16; a fine copy


First edition of an estimated 300 copies. The two poems are ‘A Plea for the Ragged Schools of London’ by Elizabeth Barrett Browning and ‘The Twins’ by Robert Browning. The cost of printing the pamphlet was paid by the Brownings and the proceeds were given to the Ragged Schools.


Thomas J Wise and Buxton Forman copied the format of this printing for their forgeries, even going as far to claim that the format had in fact been first used on their forgery of The Ruanaway Slave (supposedly printed in 1849), and then had been copied by the Brownings fot Two Poems.


Ashley, i, p.110. 51


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104