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179 178 177


177. LE CAIN, Errol (illustrator). The Faber Book of children’s Songs. London; Faber And Faber Limited. 1970.


£68


4to. original pictorial white boards elaborately blocked in black, yellow and red, preserved in repeat dustwrapper; pp. [iv], 5-159; with 8 dramatic full-page coloured plates and other illustrations in black and white; a fine copy protected by an equally fine, price-clipped, dustwrapper.


First edition.


178. LE GALLIENNE, Richard. BARBIER, George[s] (illustrator). The Romance of Perfume. new York: Richard Hudnut. 1928.


£298


Tall 8vo. original cream boards prettily printed in delicate colours with a design by Barbier, with remains of card slipcase; pp. [iv], 5-46 + [i]; illustrated with colour titlepage and 8 illuminated plates printed in fine


and delicate colours; a little light spotting to covers, light mark on verso of front-free endpaper and title-page, otherwise a very good copy.


First edition thus. An attractively produced history of perfume. Complete with 16pp. original silk-tied colour-illustrated promotional pamphlet in the rear pocket which describes the Paris Salon at 20 Rue de la Paix. Barbier was principally renowned as a fashion artist illustrating for the society manual Gazette du Bon Ton. his vibrantly coloured plates for this edition are strikingly art deco in style.


179. LE MAIR, Henriette Willebeek (illustrator). [nursery Rhyme Postcards by Willebeek Le mair]. circa 1920.


£198


7 postcards, each 140 x 88mm; each white postcard illustrated with an oval, or twin oval, image of a nursery rhyme scene; all fine and unused.


From two series entitled Old Rhymes With new Pictures and Our Old nursery Rhymes.


1803 PRESEnTATion coPY FRom WALTER ScoTT To LADY hooD 180. LEYDEN, John. Scenes of infancy: Descriptive of Teviotdale. Edinburgh: Printed by James Ballantyne. 1803. £2,750


12mo., sometime finely bound by Birdsall in full dark green crushed morocco, boards with gilt line panels and corner pieces and with an elaborate circular gilt central ornament, spine panelled and lettered in gilt with gilt centre tools, red watered silk endpapers with richly gilt turn-ins. Some foxing to rear endpapers, otherwise a very good copy in a handsome binding.


First edition of Leyden’s poem based on border scenes and traditions.


An interesting association copy, inscribed by Sir Walter Scott to Lady hood “The honble Lady hood from [crossed out] with mr Walter Scott’s respectful compliments.”


Walter Scott and Leyden had been introduced to each other in 1801 by Richard heber. Leyden shared Scott’s affection for the Borders and contributed to Scott’s Border Minstrelsy in 1802. They became close friends and corresponded until Leyden’s death in 1811. Scott mourned his friend’s ‘bright and brief career’ in The Lord of the isles (canto iv. xi):


“Scenes sung by him who sings no more!


his bright and brief career is o’er, And mute his tuneful strains; Quench’d is his lamp of varied lore, That loved the light of song to pour; A distant and a deadly shore has Leyden’s cold remains!


Scott and Lady hood became close friends after her return from the West indies where she had married Sir Samuel hood (1762–1814), vice-admiral of the white. hood was posted to india in 1811 and Scott tried to introduce Lady hood to Leyden who was then working in calcutta. Scott’s last letter to his friend was indeed carried by Lady hood to india, but it arrived after Leyden’s death and was returned by Lady hood to Scott. in the letter Scott gently berates Leyden for not trying to make Lady hood’s acquaintance. “i might take a cruel revenge on you for your silence by declining Lady hood’s request to make you acquainted with her - in which case i assure you great would be your loss. She is quite a congenial spirit an ardent Scotswoman and devotedly attached to those sketches of traditional history which all the waters of the Burrampooter cannot i suspect altogether wash out of your honour’s memory…i ought to have told you that Lady hood was the honble mary mackenzie


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