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daughter of Lord Seaforth and wife of Sir Samuel hood one of our most distinguished naval heroes who goes out to take the command in your seas. Lastly she is a very intimate friend of mrs Scott’s and myself and first gained my heart by her admiration of the Scenes of infancy”.


We offer here the copy of Scenes of infancy given by Walter Scott to Lady hood.


Tipped in at the rear is a four page manuscript poem written in a Lady hood’s hand “Written at Blair Atholl Jan 5 1808…” The poem is a call for the beauty of the Scottish highlands to be celebrated in verse, as Scott and Leyden had championed the virtues of the Borders. Beginning with a description of the highland contryside “Dear native hills in towering grandeur piled” the poem compares the highland beauty to “a Scott’s, a Leyden’s, or a Thomson’s theme”, ending “i firstly hope some bard of future days/may give these lowly scenes a poet’s praise/Perhaps some Leyden yet may boldly try/To loan the muses to a highland Sky/ With native genius decked in artful(?) rhymes/ Sing scenes of infancy of northern climes./ And still these scenes with every power adorned/To soothe a poet’s mind by poets scorned”


Lady hood’s desire for a “highland Leyden” lay in her mackenzie family roots. The eldest daughter of Francis humberston mackenzie, Baron Seaforth (1754–1815) she succeeded to the family estates on the death of her father, his four sons having predeceased him. She thus became the chief of the highland clan mackenzie.


With grateful thanks to the national Library of Scotland and the national Archives of Scotland for their help in authenticating the inscription and the manuscript notes.


181. LODGE, Henry Cabot. The Storm has many Eyes. new York. W.W. norton & Company. 1973.


£298


8vo., original with price-clipped dust wrapper. A near fine copy in custom- made cloth chemise and morocco backed slipcase.


First edition inscribed by the author “For Jane Englehard with all my best wishes henry cabot Lodge.”


“This personal narrative is both history and entertainment. it describes the “inside” behind-the-scenes events - many told for the first time - in which the author happened to be “in the eye of the storm”. here ar mr Lodge’s firsthand observations on the drafting of President Eisenhower, the United States Senate, the United nations, the Suez crisis, the U-2 Affair, the Khrushchev trip, the coup against President Diem, the 1960 vice- presidential campaign, and the 1964 new hampshire non-campaign.”


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Jane Engelhard was a patron of numerous causes and institutions, including the new Jersey Symphony. She served on the Boards the metropolitan museum of Art and the morgan Library for many years. She also was a member of the Fine Arts committee of the White house, organized during the Kennedy administration; the decoration of the Small State Dining Room is among her reported contributions to the restoration of the White house. in 1977, Engelhard was the first woman appointed as a commissioner of the Port Authority of new York and new Jersey.[8] She was also a member of the Library of congress Trust Fund Board and a recipient of the Legion d’honneur.


182. LOOS, Anita. But Gentlemen marry Brunettes. new York. Boni and Liveright 1928.


£750


8vo., original cloth backed patterned paper covered boards lettered in gilt on spine; illustrations by Ralph Barton. A little chipping and rubbing to wrapper, otherwise a very good copy.


First edition, the author’s copy with her bookplate which was created by African-American illustrator Frank Walts, whose work appeared in The crisis, The masses, and The Liberator, as well as The new Yorker, harper’s Weekly, and colliers


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