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85


FiRST EDiTionS oF ThE FiRST AnD SEconD SERiES oF SKETchES BY BoZ ExTRA-iLLUSTRATED WiTh 94 iLLUSTRATionS FRom LATER EDiTionS


85. DICKENS, Charles Sketches by Boz. John Macrone. 1836-7. £7,500


8vo. 3 vols. contemporary half brown morocco, gilt borders, marbled boards, spines divided into six compartments by gilt raised bands, gilt lettering and centre tools in gilt borders, marbled endpapers, top edges gilt; with 26 plates by George cruikshank extra illustrated with 26 matching plates from the second edition plus numerous plates from other unidentified editions and portraits of Dickens and cruikshank; spines a little sunned, some browning on a few of the additional plates and surrounding leaves, a very good set.


First editions of first series (vols i & ii) and second series. That this is the first issue of the first edition is shown by the dating of the preface in vol i, ‘Furnival’s inn, February 1836’. Also included is Dickens’s new preface for the 1850 edition, which of course should not be present in a first edition, and at the back of vol ii is bound in from the second edition the tale of ‘The Tuggs’s of Ramsgate’, which was not printed in the first edition. This is a clue to the unique nature of this set - it was specially bound up, using the first edition as its basis but including material from later editions to build as complete a set as possible of Sketches of Boz and to provide a fascinating artefact of Dickensian publishing history.


George cruikshank’s 26 first edition plates have been supplemented in every instance by their second edition counterparts, which were re-engraved on a slightly larger scale. The second edition counterparts are undated, sharper and bolder, and also show some variations in design. The plates have been bound into the text as stipulated in the first edition, except for the plate at vol i, p.47, which in the first edition was used as the frontispiece. in vol iii, the first edition plate ‘vauxhall Gardens by Day’ is used as the frontispiece, as in the first edition, while the second edition plate is bound close to the page where it was placed in subsequent editions (intended for p. 216, it is actually bound at 215).


The rest of the plates include 16 extra illustrations produced by cruikshank, including the extra plates for the second edition issued in parts from 1837- 9 and those that were intended for the first edition but were not reproduced in the second, as well as the title pages for the first edition. There are also all 34 illustrations by Frederick Barnard for chapman & hall’s later household Edition, and 22 by A.B. Frost who illustrated the equivalent American edition. Also included are 4 plates by Pierce Egan, 2 by Darley, 1 by Pailthorpe and 15 by unidentified artists. This proliferation of plates is not so unusual. As J.A. hammerton writes, “…it was a common custom for readers to bind [Dickens’s early works] to their individual tastes, and in the binding of the volumes to enrich them by the insertion of special plates separately issued for this purpose by various publishers” (The Dickens Picture- Book, p. 39).


Cohn, George Cruikshank A Catalogue Raisonné, pp 75-77; Smith, Charles Dickens in the Original Cloth, Vol 1 pp 1-16.


86. DICKENS, Charles. The Pic nic Papers. By various hands. Edited by charles Dickens. Henry Colburn. 1841.


£1,250


8vo., 3 volumes sometime bound by Rivière & Son in full dark green morocco, boards with french fillet panel, spines lettered and decorated in gilt, original boards bound in at rear. Frontispieces and plates by George cruikshank, Phiz, &c. A little rubbing to joints, gilt on spines a little dulled otherwise a very good set preserved in marbled paper covered slipcase.


First edition, 2nd issue, with the corrected ‘young publisher’ in the preface. The Pic-nic Paperswas composed of miscellaneous pieces by various authors. it was originated by Dickens to benefit the widow and children of 28-year old publisher John macrone, who died suddenly in 1837. Dickens had begun soliciting submissions in 1838, and he eventually contributed the “introduction” and one short story “The Lamplighter’s Story”. other contributors included William harrison Ainsworth, Thomas moore, Leitch Ritchie and Agnus Strickland. macrone’s widow eventually received 450 pounds from this charitable publication.


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