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199. NESBIT, E. (author). Gordon BROWNE and Lewis BAUMER (illustrator). The new Treasure Seekers. London; T. Fisher Unwin. 1907.


£98


8vo. Sometime bound in crimson morocco over deep red cloth boards, spine with 5 raised bands handsomely ruled and lettered in gilt with gilt centres, top edge gilt; pp. [x], 11-328 + [8] publisher’s catalogue; with line drawings throughout; a near fine copy.


Second edition. WiTh ScARcE 1942 LEAFLET


200. NESBIT, Roy Conyers & VAN ACKER, Georges. The Flight of Rudolf hess. myths and Reality. With an introduction by the Duke of hamilton. Stroud. Sutton Publishing. 1999.


£198 8vo., original cloth with dust wrapper. A very good copy.


First edition. With loosely inserted a 4 page leaflet The Truth about the Duke and the Arrival of Rudolf Hess in Scotland, printing extracts from the Parliamentary Debates in the house of commons on may 22nd and may 27th 1941. This pamphlet, reproduced by permission of hmSo, asserts through the commons’ statements, the position that the Duke of hamilton had not met Rudolf hess before his arrival in Britain on the evening of may 10th 1941, and that the the BBc had broadcast an inaccurate


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statement about hamilton receiving a letter from hess because of erroneous facts disseminated by the ministry of information.


There was considerable press speculation about hamilton’s role in hess’s arrival in Britain. The leader of the British communist Party, harry Pollitt, issued a pamphlet Why is Hess Here? and the publisher of World news and Views h Goodman ran an article suggesting that hess and the Duke were friends and that hamilton supported the activities of hiltler and hess. hamilton sued for libel, winning his case and being awarded court costs. counsel for the defendants said that all his clients, except Pollitt, accepted responsibility and had published this text the article and circular on the assumption that the material was first issued by the B.B.c. and was official and authentic. Goodman, but not Pollitt, also publically apologised to the Duke. it seems likely that this leaflet that both exonerates hamilton while at the same time blaming the ministry of information and the BBc was printed as support to Goodman’s public apology.


201. NIBLICK. hints to Golfers. Salem, Massachusetts: Published for the Author by The Salem Press Company. 1903.


£125


8vo., original green cloth lettered and decorated in orange and black. Printed in black and green. With portrait frontispiece, drawings and diagrams. A very good copy.


Fifth edition, limited to 1000 numbered copies. With embossed library roundel of Edward Gregory on lower free endpaper.


202. NICOLAS (Wine Merchants). Blanc et Rouge. Rose et noir. Bleu Blanc Rose. Paris. Les Etablissements nicolas. 1930-1932. £1,350


Folio, 3 volumes in original wrappers. With 24 fine art deco illustrations in black and white by Paul iribe and one in colour. very good copies.


one of 500 copies (there was also an issue of 20 copies on japon}. A complete set of these three booklets published as promotional pieces for the nicolas wine merchants with striking Art Deco illustrations in colour and black and white of contemporary life. inserted as issued into Rose et noir is a 16 page pamphlet by René Benjamin entitled Dialogue Moderne en Trois Temps et Trois Cocktails.


The first album, Blanc et Rouge pays homage to the colours of French wines in the form of an ironic dialogue between the mode for jazz and cocktails and respect for tradition, with ten plates of chic Jazz Age wine drinkers. The second album, Rose et noir, is a sinister series of nine images, printed in pink and black based on photographic processes, of the ill effects of the American cocktail on a young couple. (it won second prize in a contemporary new York photography competition, after herbert Bayer and before man Ray and moholy-nagy.) The third album, Bleu Blanc Rose, is the political and chauvinistic argument for French wine versus foreign alcohols: beer, vodka and whisky, with angry depictions of the political regimes of Germany, Russia, England and the United States (“L”Arbitre du monde”, depicted as a gangster against the new York skyline) with four fold out plates and one colour plate representing a pleasant France (“mais quand on boit du vin on ne perd pas la tête”).


Also loosely inserted is a four page advertising leaflet for nicolas entitled Le Service des vins doit etre une symphonie, detailing the dos and don’ts of serving wine and following them with examples of examples of wine crimes “c’est une hérésie de servier du champagne sec à la fin du repas”.


Paul iribe, the son of a Basque engineer, was born in Spain in 1883. he served his apprenticeship with Le Temps and in 1901 began work as an illustrator with the satirical newspaper, Le Rire. iribe also had drawings published in Le Sourire, Le Cri de Paris and Le Joyrnal de Paris. he also provided material for the anarchist newspaper, L’Assiette au Beurre. iribe died in 1935.


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