This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
44


158


159


160


162


160. JAMES, M.R. more Ghost Stories of an Antiquary. new York: Longmans, Green & Co.. 1911.


£750


8vo. original oatmeal canvas, lettered in black on spine and upper cover; a very nice copy.


First US edition.


161. JANSSON, Tove (author and illustrator). Kuinkas Sitten Kävikään? [What happened next?]. Suom. Hannes Korpi - Anttila. [1952].


£398 161


158. HUISH, Robert. Bees: Their natural history and General management: comprising a Full and Experimental Examination of the various Systems of native and Foreign Apiarians; With an Analytical Exposition of the Errors of the Theory of huber; containing, Also, the Latest Discoveries and improvements in Every Department of the Apiary. Henry G. Bohn. 1844.


£400


8vo. contemporary full green morocco, gilt borders to sides, spine with gilt panels and tools and gilt lettering, gilt turn ins, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt; pp. xxvii, 9-451 (as issued), frontispiece portrait of huish, numerous text illustrations; spine attractively sunned, very handsome binding, internally very clean, very good. Provenance: bookplate to front pastedown of Frederic Straker (1863 - 1941) of Angerton hall, morpeth. he was a keen racehorse breeder and huntsman and had a fine library of travel and natural history books.


new (fourth) edition, greatly enlarged. Robert huish (1777-1850) has been generally regarded as a prolific hack on numerous subjects. nevertheless, his book on bees, first published under the title A treatise on the nature, economy, and practical management of bees in 1815, proved popular and successful, running to several editions. he was in fact an experienced, knowledgeable and opinionated apiarist, and this edition of the work is notable for the inclusion of his one-man crusade against the great Swiss entomologist huber: “in the 1844 edition of A Treatise he set out in tabular form the thirty-four ‘errors’ of huber. This tabulation shows how far huber advanced scientific apiculture, whereas huish, for all his technical skill, failed to make full observations and to interpret his observations correctly. he also assumed that his own conclusions, based on a single hive, were ‘normal’ for all colonies of bees. however, despite its faults, A Treatise offers a good insight into both British and European beekeeping in the opening decades of the nineteenth century.” (DnB).


British Bee Books 176.


159.HUTCHINSON, A.S.M. The Golden Pound and other Stories. Hodder and Stoughton. 1930


£248


8vo., original cloth with dust wrapper designed by Eugene hastain. Spine of wrapper a little browned otherwise a near fine copy.


First edition.


Royal 8vo. original fawn cloth-backed red pictorial boards boldly stamped in colours with a large circular viewing window to upper cover and a tiny one to lower board, pictorial pastedowns; pp. [24]; gloriously and exuberantly illustrated throughout on every page in bold colours incorporating the text in panels; each leaf with a die-cut viewing window of irregular shape fashioned in sympathy with the image; externally and internally fine with just minor fading to fore-edge of upper cover; scarce.


First Finnish edition, with text in Finnish. This book was later published in English as The Book About Moomin, Mymble and Little My (1953). This is the first moomin book to be translated and is a work principally known for its interesting format in which carefully constructed die-cut leaves give a tantalizing glimpse of how the story will unfold. moomin has been sent out for milk by his mama. on his return he comes across mymble who is crying because she cannot find her little sister my. The pair set off on the trail.


162. JANSSON, Tove (author and illustrator). vem Ska Trösta Knyttet? [Who Will comfort creep?]. [Helsinki]; Gebers. 1960. £398


Royal 8vo. original grey cloth-backed pictorial boards, printed pastedowns; pp. [28]; illustrated throughout in extravagant and bold colour on every page; a fine copy, both internally and externally; very scarce.


First edition, printed in Finland, with text in Swedish. A delightful and sentimental tale about a small creature, or Toffle, who lives alone in a large house. Fear of loneliness encourages him to venture out into the unknown where he comes across several amazing characters but is too shy to become acquainted. Eventually he discovers a figure even lonelier and more isolated that himself and sets out to rescue her.


163. JONES, Elizabeth Orton (author and illustrator). Twig. new York; The Macmillan Company. 1942.


£198


8vo. original emerald green cloth lettered in black, pictorial endpapers, preserved in pictorial dustwrapper; pp. [viii], 9-152; prettily, and profusely, illustrated with lithographs in colour and monochrome; a very nice copy indeed with some dusting to joints, a little browning to inner hinges and mild toning to stock throughout; the unclipped dustwrapper ($2.00) with some wear to spine including chipping to head and tail, some light scuffing, and mild tanning alongside small nicks to corners and minor edge creasing.


First edition. Twig is a little American girl who lives in the fourth floor flat of a “high sort of house” in the city. one day she finds an empty tomato can in the alley, which she fashions into a pretty little house for a fairy. This is the story of what happened in and around that little house one Saturday afternoon (Blurb). in 1945 Elizabeth orton Jones won the Caldecott Medal for her illustrations for Prayer for a Child by Rachel Field.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104