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Leviathan bringing American service personnel home from France. Working as a troop ship she made three cruises from new York to Brest, returning over 25,000 troops, nurses, and civilians to the United States.


Decommissioned at hoboken, new Jersey in early 1919, imperator was transferred to the British shipping controller on 20 September, and it was decided that she would be operated by cunard. Renamed the Berengaria she served as flagship of the cunard fleet until she was replaced by her sister ship, majestic - ex-Bismarck, in 1934 after the merger of cunard with White Star Line. in later years, Berengaria was used for discounted prohibition-dodging cruises, which earned her the unfortunate nickname “Bargain-area”.


Towards the end of her service life, she suffered several electrical fires caused by aging wiring, and cunard-White Star opted to retire her in 1938. She was sold to Sir John Jarvis, who also purchased olympic, to provide work for his local region. She sailed for the River Tyne under the command of captain George Gibbons and was scrapped down to the waterline. Final demolition took place in 1946.


An imPoRTAnT WoRK BY A PionEER oF RADioThERAPY AnD An ASSociATE oF ThE cURiES, inScRiBED To hiS DAUGhTER ‘To mY DEAR LiTTLE ELEcTRiciTY GiRL’


150.HAMMER, William Joseph. Radium, and other Radio-Active Substances; Polonium, Actinium, and Thorium. With a consideration of Phosphorescent and Fluorescent Substances, the Properties and Applications of Selenium and the Treatment of Disease by the Ultra- violet Light. new York. D. Van nostrand Company., 1903.


£298


8vo., original green cloth lettered in gilt on spine and upper board. With 39 illustrations. A fine copy.


First edition.The electical engineer and scientist hammer (1858-1934) studied at various schools in newark, nJ and the University of Berlin and the Technische hochschule before working briefly with Edward Weston in newark and then obtaining a position with Thomas A. Edison at his menlo Park laboratory. hammer undertook much pioneering work in the field of electricity for Edison, constructing the holborn viaduct electricity


station (the first


commercial central-station electric power plant in the world) in 1882 and demonstrating the first electric sign — which he invented — at the crystal


Palace Electrical Exposition of that year, and holding a series of important positions in the Edison company in the United States and Europe, before his decision to establish an independent practice as a consulting electrical engineer in new York city in 1890. ‘in the summer of 1902, after visiting marie and Pierre curie in Paris, hammer returned to the United States with samples of their newly discovered element radium. he then began a series of pioneering investigations that resulted in practical applications such as luminous gun sights, watch dials and instrument faces, and, most


importantly, the use of radium in the treatment of cancer, which Hammer was one of the first to propose. in 1903 he wrote one of the earliest published works on the subject, Radium and Other Radioactive Substances, which went through several editions in the United States and Europe. Between 1902 and 1909 hammer published numerous encyclopedia and technical journal articles on radioactivity […] and lectured extensively on his own work and that of the curies’ (American national Biography).


151. [HANDCOLOURING]. LAMBERT, Mme. J.J., pseud. [Jules ROSTAING] (author). TELORY (illustrator). Petites histoires. Paris; Delarue, Libraire Editeur, Rue des Grands Augustins, no. 3. [1859].


£188


Landscape 8vo. original dark green textured cloth panelled in blind enclosing a large illustration blocked in gilt to upper cover; pp. [32]; with engraved title and 15 other fine lithographed plates, all prettily handcoloured; externally near fine; internally generally clean, fresh, and tight with some toning to endpapers, a light sprinkling of foxing, and faint tide-marks barely affecting the margins of 7 of the plates (more visible on the blank versos); with pencil rules and a child’s inscription, dated 1860, to front pastedown endpapers; scarce.


First edition of this collection of short stories. Only two copies listed on OCLC (new York and California).


152. HARRODS. Fashionable Rendezvous. Harrods. [no date c.1901].


£998


6 mounted colour prints, 550 x 450mm in mount, preserved in cloth covered box.


Taken from harrods’ lavish catalogue for the Season Fashionable Rendezvous. With the original tissue guard to the plate with descriptions of the clothes featured, and the prices, on the back of the mounts, including such items as “An original model by margaine Lecroix in pale lemon tussore. The corsage is of blue net cleverly appliqued with tussore and the dress is an example of the Renaissance period. Price 35 guineas. copy of the same 22 guineas” and “clair tres chic hat, made of valenciennes lace, market bunch of flowres, fine crinoline lining to face. Price 6 Guineas”.


The six plates are captioned: “harrods - The house of Quality” “The vestibule at the opera” “hyde Park” “hurlingham” “The Grand Foyer - hotel Ritz” “Ascot - The Paddock”


The original cover, which is worn, and the text are preserved in a cloth folder within the custom-made box. There is an introductory essay “The London Scene. An impression” by Richard Burbidge the managing Director of harrods, two other essays by “harrods Experts”, Commands in Costumes and Mantles and The Season’s Millinery, Blouses, Tea Gowns, etc and 9 pages printed in black and white showing styles of robes, gowns, tea and dressing gowns, lace fashions, and floral toques, hair ornaments and Garnitures.


A fascinating, lavish catalogue issued by harrods, showing the fashions of early Edwardian England.


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