This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
National Guard • Cause Magazine


Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC)


There are different ways to become an officer. If you’re heading to college, the ROTC program is the way to go. You can earn a commission and a degree. National Guard Scholarships may also be available for qualified applicants. Army ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps) is a col- lege elective that allows you to earn a commission straight out of college as a second lieutenant in the Army National Guard. ROTC consists of both academic classes and hands-on training. These mental and physical challenges will help you succeed in college and beyond. Participation takes just a few hours per week, so it won’t


interfere with other academic studies, sports or your social life. You’ll learn about leadership and teamwork, and have the oppor- tunity to learn skills like mountaineering, rappelling and orien- teering. It may be one of the best college classes you’ll ever take.


The Advanced Course is offered to students who demon- strate the interest and potential to become Guard officers and who meet the physical, mental and scholastic standards. This normally takes place during your final two years of college and includes: • Management principles • Military justice • Cultural awareness • Military tactics and ethics


Upon successful completion of the ROTC program, you’ll be commissioned as a second lieutenant. In addition to being an Army National Guard officer, you’ll have leadership skills that are in high demand outside the military.


Scholarships Training


The four-year Army ROTC program is divided into two parts: the Basic Course and the Advanced Course.


The Basic Course is usually taken during the first two years of college. Unless you receive Army scholarship funds, you incur NO military obligation. You’ll learn: • Leadership development • Goal-setting and accomplishment • College survival study skills • Time management • Military history • Military operations and tactics • Customs and traditions of the service


National Guard Scholarships may be available for qualified applicants. The Army National Guard provides financial assis- tance to students who wish to attend college and enlist in the Guard with two major scholarships: the Dedicated Army National Guard scholarship (DEDNG) and the Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty contract (GRFD). For full-time students, these scholarships pay full tuition and mandatory fees, or can pay room and board (not to exceed $10,000 per year). In addition, cadets will be paid a monthly stipend. Following graduation, cadets begin a new Military Service Obligation (MSO) contract and serve eight years in the Guard, which includes training.


For more information :


go to www.nationalguard.com/careers/lead-from-the-top/rotc or talk to an Army ROTC representative at a college campus near you.


Note: Army National Guard programs and benefits are subject to change. For the latest information, please contact your local recruiter.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112